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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Cross, Victoria

Pseudonym of India-born UK author Annie Sophie Cory (1868-1952) – also known as Vivian Cross; she was the sister of Adela Florence Nicolson (1875-1904) who wrote as Laurence Hope; early in her career, she was briefly notorious for The Woman Who Didn't (1895), written in response to Grant Allen's The Woman Who Did (1895). Her only known sf is Martha Brown, M.P.: A Girl of To-morrow (1935), which depicts relationships in a Utopian thirtieth-century UK ruled by women: unemployment, war and ...

Brood, The

Film (1979). Mutual Productions/Elgin International. Written and directed David Cronenberg. Cast includes Samantha Eggar, Art Hindle, Cindy Hinds and Oliver Reed. 91 minutes. Colour. / In this Canadian film, the Somafree Institute of Psychoplasmics's pop psychologist Raglan (Reed), author of The Shape of Rage, is regarded with suspicion by Carveth (Hindle), whose wife Nola (Eggar) is a patient there. Gathering evidence against Raglan, Carveth finds dreadful physical changes taking place in ...

Jones, Nick

(1972-    ) UK author whose first series, the Downstream Diaries sequence beginning with Downstream (2014 ebook), comprises a first assay at the Time Travel intricacies more fully espoused in the Joseph Bridgeman sequence, beginning with And Then She Vanished (2021) and featuring the same protagonist. In the first iteration of the series, a London antique dealer is inveigled by a time traveller to go on missions into the past in order to rectify the consequences of crimes ...

Near Future

Images of the near future in sf differ markedly from those of the Far Future in both content and attitude. The far future tends to be associated with notions of ultimate destiny, and is dominated by metaphors of senescence; its images display a world irrevocably transfigured. It is viewed from a detached viewpoint; the dominant mood is – paradoxically – one of nostalgia, because the far future, like the dead past, can be entered only imaginatively, and has meaning only in terms of ...

Cyberspace

An item of sf Terminology introduced by William Gibson in his novel Neuromancer (1984). He takes quite an old sf idea, also much discussed by scientists, in imagining a Near-Future era in which the human brain and nervous system (biological) can interface directly with the global Internet (electrical) by jacking neurally implanted electrodes directly into a networked Computer (or "cyberdeck"). The network then entered by the human mind is perceived by it, Gibson tells us, as if it were an ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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