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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
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Evans, E Everett

(1893-1958) US sf fan and author, who began to publish relatively late in life, his first story of genre interest being "Perfection" for The Vortex #2 in 1947, and who had mixed success, though there is no doubt of the affection in which other Californian sf writers and fans held him, as evinced in the many tributes to him – from writers such as E E "Doc" Smith and A E van Vogt – that were included in a compilation of his macabre fantasy stories, Food for Demons: The E Everett Evans ...

Sharp, Robert George

(1902-1967) UK author, initially of crime thrillers under his own name, two of these – The Cry from the Ether (1934) and Horror Castle (1936) – being of some genre interest. Most of his later work was relatively routine sf as by Jon J Deegan, (possibly a House Name, though Sharp may have used the name exclusively), initially for the Old Growler series, Reconnoitre Krellig II (1951), which comprises a one-story issue of Authentic Science Fiction (one-story issues are treated as books ...

Elliott, Kate

Pseudonym of US author Alis A Rasmussen (1958-    ), who has written as Kate Elliott since 1992. Under her own name, her first novel, The Labyrinth Gate (1988), is a tale of considerable interest, delineating a believably matrilineal fantasy world. The Highroad Trilogy – comprising A Passage of Stars (1990), Revolution's Shore (1990) and The Price of Ransom (1990) – depicts the interstellar adventures of its young female protagonist, who sets out to search for ...

Marshall, Edison

(1894-1967) US author and big-game hunter, best known for his work outside the sf field, especially his many historical novels, though he began publishing sf early in his career with "Who is Charles Avison?" (April 1916 Argosy), an early Counter-Earth tale; the From a Frontiersman's Diary series (August 1919-January 1920 Blue Book) featured stories involving the strange and/or the supernatural. Some of his early novels verge on Lost Race territory, such as The Splendid Quest (1934). The ...

Kipling, Rudyard

(1865-1936) UK journalist, poet and author known mainly for such works outside the sf field as Plain Tales from the Hills (coll 1888) – which does contain some supernatural tales – and Kim (1901) [see below]; he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907. During World War One, a conflict he had named "The Great War" as early as 1899, he wrote a great deal of propaganda, but the loss of his son in combat darkened the rest of his life. Kipling began to publish work of genre interest ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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