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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Starr, Bill

(1933-2021) US author primarily known for the Farstar and Son sequence of Space Opera adventures featuring a slightly rascally entrepreneur and his son: The Way to Dawnworld (1975) and The Treasure of Wonderwhat (1977). The books have something of the quaintness of their titles. Starr's other known sf consists of a single short story, "The People Who Could Not Kill" (in Stellar #3, anth 1977, ed Judy-Lynn del Rey). [JC]

Todd, G X

(?   -    ) UK librarian and author who is of sf interest for The Voices sequence beginning with The Defender (2017), set in a Near Future Disaster-riven massively depopulated America whose survivors, haunted by imperative voices in their heads, begin to behave in an atavistically "pre-conscious" manner, specifically linked by Todd to Julian Jaynes's arguments in The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind (1976). Hunted (2018) carries ...

Satchell, William

(1861-1942) UK-born farmer, publisher, journalist and author, in New Zealand from 1886; intermittently active as a poet and journalist from around 1880, sometimes as by Samuel Cliall White and other names not identified. Of his four novels, the least popular was The Elixir of Life (1907), an sf story in which Immortality is sought, and perhaps achieved, through the Invention of a disease-averting serum. [JC]

Tabler, Joseph

(1949-    ) US author, almost certainly California-based, and probably the Joseph Tabler who runs a bookshop in Los Angeles; of his thrillers, three have some sf interest: Capitol Hill Clones (1981), a political Satire involving a scatty use of Clones; The Microwave Caper (1981), in which a mysterious Ray fries its victims; and The Meteoric Affair (1982). [JC]

Frenkel, James R

(1948-    ) US editor, married to Joan D Vinge since 1980. In the late 1970s and early 1980s he was with Dell Books, where he edited (anonymously) the Binary Star books, each comprising two titles bound sequentially (see Dos): Binary Star #1 containing Destiny Times Three (March-April 1945 Astounding; 1957; 1978 dos) by Fritz Leiber and Riding the Torch (in Threads of Time, anth 1974, ed Robert Silverberg; 1978 dos) by Norman Spinrad, Binary Star #2 containing the first ...

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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