Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
Sponsor of the day: Joe Haldeman

Knox, Ronald A

(1888-1957) UK priest, journalist and author; ordained an Anglican priest in 1912, he converted to Catholicism in 1917, becoming a Catholic priest in 1919. Among his many books are several well-regarded if somewhat dull detective novels, volumes of Parodies, a new translation of the Testaments, and some genre work. A Still More Sporting Adventure!: Humbly Dedicated to the Authoresses of "An Adventure" and Transcribed by the Misses Lavinia & Priscilla Daisyfield (1911 chap) with Charles ...

Ward, Joy

(?   -    ) US author of the Young Adult Haint: A Tale of Extraterrestrial Intervention and Love Across Time and Space (2005), in which after aeons of mutual adaptation, survivors of doglike Aliens (who have become domestic canines) and Homo sapiens roam the Ruined Earth, which has been devastated by Climate Change. The eponymous Weimeramer narrates. [JC]

Berryman, John

(1916-1988) US author and economist who was chief executive officer of a hardware wholesale company; author of some two dozen stories, beginning with "Special Flight" for Astounding in May 1939 and ending with "The Big Dish" (November 1986 Analog). His most anthologized story is "BEROM" (January 1951 Astounding), in which initially incomprehensible visiting Aliens prove to be speaking in a UK commercial telegraph code of the 1920s that they picked up via radio (see Linguistics). "The Trouble ...

Barker, Arthur W

(?   -?   ) US author of The Light from Sealonia (1927), a Lost World novel set in a deep valley near the North Pole; two opposing civilizations inhabit the cleft, both boasting high Technology, Utopian Sealonia containing fair-skinned abstemious descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel, Nodolia containing dark-skinned hedonists descended from Cain and his ilk (see Race in SF; Religion; Sex). Thomas Alva Edison clearly subtends the great Sealonian inventor Nosede ...

Genone, Hudor

Pseudonym of US soldier, businessman and author William James Roe (1843-1921) for his sf and fantasy; he also produced some non-fantastic work under his own name and under other pseudonyms, including G I Cervus and Viroe. He was a freethinker – a disposition of mind found with surprising infrequency among nineteenth-century sf writers – and in an sf Satire, Inquirendo Island (1886), he dramatized in unmistakable terms his negative feelings about Christianity. The protagonist, ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies