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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 21 January 2022
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Pierce, John J

(1941-    ) US editor and critic, son of John R Pierce, with a background in Fandom, editor of a Fanzine, Renaissance, in the 1960s, and at that time author of reasoned polemical articles about the damage he saw being wrought on sf by writers of the New Wave. Pierce edited Galaxy November 1977-March/April 1979, years in which through no special fault of his the magazine was rapidly declining. Later he published an ambitious sequence of critical books about sf, A Study in ...

Tyson, J Aubrey

(1870-1930) US author whose Near Future thriller, The Scarlet Tanager (1922), which is set in 1930, rousingly presents a submarine pirate and his right-wing cohorts; a tough US intelligence agent opposes their efforts to topple the American government. A UK agent, the actress of the title, also becomes involved. Sf devices include sonar and an invisible Ray. The Barge of Haunted Lives (coll of linked stories 1923) includes several supernatural tales told in a Club Story venue. [JC]

Miller, Leo E

(1887-1952) US explorer and author, his nonfiction tending to focus on his travels in South America, and of the Hidden People sequence of Lost Race tales for boys, comprising The Hidden People: The Story of a Search for Incan Treasure (1920), In the Tiger's Lair (1921) and (less interestingly) The Jungle Pirates (1925). Miller's realistic handling of geography and the natural sciences makes more embarrassing his auctorial approval of the series' protagonists, goldhunter adolescents who, on ...

Boland, John

(1913-1976) UK author and journalist, a prolific story producer, although rarely of sf. His sf novels, White August (1955) and No Refuge (1956), are both set in frigid conditions. The first is a Disaster tale, dealing with the dire effects of a botched attempt at Weather Control. No Refuge depicts a Lost World Utopia in the Arctic, into which two criminals accidentally irrupt; after a good deal of discussion they are dealt with properly. Operation Red Carpet (1959) is borderline. Holocaust ...

Psionics

A common item of sf Terminology, usually referring to the study and use of Psi Powers, under which head this meaning is discussed. Never part of the vocabulary of J B Rhine, whose speculations fell on fertile ground in the early-middle days of Genre SF (see Golden Age of SF), the term seems to have first appeared in print in Jack Williamson's story "The Greatest Invention" (July 1951 Astounding). John W Campbell Jr became an eager advocate of psionics, not only in fiction but as a real-world ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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