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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Bug-Eyed Monsters

A traditional visual Cliché of sf: grotesque Alien beings, usually menacing, as regularly pictured on the covers of SF Magazines of the 1930s and 1940s: Howard V Brown's early covers for Thrilling Wonder Stories are regarded as archetypal. Often known by their acronym, BEMS. Relevant theme anthologies include Bug-Eyed Monsters (anth 1972) edited by Anthony Cheetham, Asimov's Choice: Black Holes & Bug-Eyed Monsters (anth 1977) edited by George H Scithers and Bug-Eyed Monsters (anth ...

Kelton, Aryan

Working name of US author Aryon Lewis Kelton (1892-1957), who also wrote as A Lewis Kelton; his sf novel, The Great Haddon (1933), features a psychoanalyst who uses his powers of Telepathy in an attempt to dominate Wall Street and to obtain Sex from unwitting female victims. An earlier book by Kelton, the nonfiction Power of the Universe (1929), argues that the human subconscious is more powerful than we ken. [JC]

Atlas/Seaboard Comics

Seaboard Periodicals was founded in 1974 by former Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman and his son Charles "Chip" Goodman. Atlas was the name of the imprint used for Seaboard's Comics titles: the company is referred to as Atlas/Seaboard to avoid confusion with the 1950s Atlas Comics, the predecessor of Marvel Comics. The company attempted to publish a line of colour comics in various genres, including the Superheroes Ironjaw, Tiger-Man and The Cougar (created by Steve Mitchell). A line of ...

Mythology

The relationship of mythology to sf is close and deep, but not always obvious. Part of the confusion stems from the widely held belief that sf is itself a form of latter-day mythology, fulfilling comparable hungers in us. James Blish took issue with this argument, pointing out that myth is usually "static and final in intent and thus entirely contrary to the spirit of sf, which assumes continuous change". We restrict ourselves below to the role of traditional mythologies in sf and to the ...

Hoobler, Dorothy

(1941-    ) US author, mostly of nonfiction in collaboration with her husband, Thomas Hoobler, whom see for details. [JC]

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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