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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 May 2022
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Kitchell, Joseph Gray

(1862-1945) US businessman, photographer and author, whose early novella, The Story of the "Kranbach Nocturne" (1905 chap), treats the eponymous Basilisk as soul-saving. His full-length sf novel, The Earl of Hell (1924), combines high adventure – its protagonist travels the world in search of new sources of radium, is kidnapped, foils a plot to supply "Hunovia" (i.e. Germany) with a brand-new Power Source – and an informed discussion of the potentialities of new forms of energy. ...

Shurin, Jared

(?    -    ) US editor, long resident in the UK with his wife and co-anthologist Anne C Perry, with whom he founded the Pornokitsch blog and the Kitschies Awards (which see) first presented in 2010. He and Perry began to publish anthologies of genre interest with Pandemonium: Stories of the Apocalypse (anth 2011), which had several successors [see Checklist below]. Three later titles are themed for Supernatural Creatures: mummies as classic Monsters in ...

Planetary Romance

Any sf tale whose primary venue (excluding contemporary or Near-Future versions of Earth) is a planet, and whose plot turns to a significant degree upon the nature of that venue, can be described as a planetary romance. For the term to apply properly, however, it is not enough that a tale simply be set on a world: James Blish's A Case of Conscience (September 1953 If; exp 1958), for instance, has a planet as a primary venue yet cannot be called a planetary romance because the nature or ...

Hunter, Mel

Working name of American artist Milford Joseph Hunter III (1927-2004). After growing up with an abusive father, Hunter attended Northwestern University in Illinois before moving to California, where he worked as an artist for Northrop Aircraft Corporation. But he began seeking employment as a freelance artist, and in early 1953 he sold his first cover to Galaxy magazine, depicting some men preparing a spaceship for flight, unusually observed from above. As early covers indicate, Hunter's human ...

Herbert, William

Pseudonym of the unidentified UK author (?   -?   ) of The World Grown Young: Being a Brief Record of Reforms Carried Out from 1894-1914 by the Late Mr Philip Adams, Millionaire and Philanthropist (1892), a placidly tendentious record of Near-Future reforms imposed benevolently from above upon a grateful UK by its richest citizen. Attacks by Russia and the USA are routinely defeated. [JC]

Robinson, Roger

(1943-    ) UK computer programmer, bibliographer and publisher, active in UK Fandom for many years. The Writings of Henry Kenneth Bulmer (1983 chap; rev 1984 chap) is an exhaustive Bibliography of one of the most prolific sf writers, and Who's Hugh?: An SF Reader's Guide to Pseudonyms (1987) is similarly exhaustive in its listing of Pseudonyms. Criticized at first for its failure to annotate its findings – so that, for instance, pseudonyms used for sf could not be ...



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