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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Matson, Norman

(1892-1965) US author now best known for his completion, after the death of Thorne Smith, of the latter's The Passionate Witch (1941), capturing Smith's melancholy, mildly madcap, sentimentally erotic style very neatly, despite touches of unSmithian sourness. Matson also wrote a sequel, Bats in the Belfry (1943). A film, I Married a Witch (1942), and the television series Bewitched (1964-1972) were loosely based on the books. Earlier Matson wrote a fantasy, Flecker's Magic (1926; vt Enchanted ...

Monster on the Campus

Film (1958). Universal. Directed by Jack Arnold. Written by David Duncan. Cast includes Troy Donahue, Arthur Franz, Joanna Moore and Judson Pratt. 77 minutes. Black and white. / This is one of Jack Arnold's last and poorest sf films, a variation on the Jekyll and Hyde theme: blood from a specimen coelacanth causes living creatures to devolve (see Devolution); a Scientist (Franz) temporarily but repeatedly becomes an apeman (see Apes as Human). The film is, foolishly, structured as a mystery ...

Bidston, Lester

(1883-1938) UK author of stories for the early-twentieth-century Boys' Papers, including contributions to the Dixon Hawke series of detective tales, and of thirteen Sexton Blake thrillers (some published anonymously) between 1927 and 1939; his only sf book proper under his own name was A Leap Through Space (1921), a tale whose young protagonists visit various planets, including an inhabited Mars. Treasure of the North! A Gripping Romance of Peril & Adventure in the Arctic (1927) as by Paul ...

Dingle, A E

(1879-1947) UK seaman and author, chiefly of sea stories, many published as by Captain Dingle. His pseudonyms include Brian Cotterell and, more prolifically, "Sinbad". It has been suggested that Fletcher's Island (1932; vt Sinister Eden 1934) as by Brian Cotterell is sf or supernatural, but it is in fact a detective novel in an exotic setting. As "Sinbad", he wrote two Lost World tales, Pirates May Fly (1943) and The Age-Old Kingdom (19 August-9 September 1922 Argosy All-Story Weekly; 1947), in ...

Trew, Antony

(1906-1996) South African naval officer (mercantile and military) and author, in UK from the early 1960s; in World War Two he eventually commanded his own ship, primarily escorting convoys. His anti-apartheid opinions did not directly inform his fiction, most of it being historical dramas set at sea. Of sf interest are his first novel, Two Hours To Darkness (1962), a Near Future tale whose protagonist, a submarine captain who has gone mad, moves the world toward World War Three in 1964; and ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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