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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 8 December 2022
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Pynchon, Thomas

(1937-    ) US author, all of whose works are Fabulations in that most of them resemble sf under some interpretations (see also Fantastika), and Against the Day (2006) is undoubtedly sf. Though the Paranoia-wracked worlds his protagonists inhabit may defeat any secure reading of the malign figurations of reality, the narrative patterning of most of his work is ...

Satō Haruo

(1892-1964) Japanese author and poet, very much part of the mainstream literary establishment, remembered in sf terms for an early experiment in Dystopia and fantasies that prefigured those of dedicated genre authors such as Jūza Unno. Satō was only sixteen when his first work was published, a poem in the literary magazine Myōjō. He soon attained celebrity as a poet and occasional ...

Blankenship, William D

(1934-    ) US author whose books often interweave Technothriller and horror modes (see Horror in SF); they include The Helix File (1972), a technothriller with an Arctic setting; The Programmed Man (1973), involving nearly near-future Computers and a purloined Invention; Brotherly Love (1981), a horror ...

Chafe, Paul

(1965-    ) Canadian author and army reserve officer who began to publish work of genre interest with "Prisoner of War" in Man-Kzin Wars VII (anth 1995) edited by Larry Niven; he went on to produce the first full-length novel in the Man-Kzin Wars Shared World sequence, Destiny's Forge (2006). Mission Critical: Death of the Phoenix (1996) is a ...

Noy, John

(1892-1964) UK author of nautical thrillers, including at least two Children's SF adventures: The Vulture (1927), describing the travails of a young doctor shanghaied into working for pirates in the combined submarine/Airship which is their Invention; and The Pirate Airship (1931), featuring an advanced combination airship/surface ship/submarine. [JC]

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos ...



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