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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Gardner, John [2]

(1933-1982) US author and academic who achieved popularity with his large contemporary novel, The Sunlight Dialogues (1972); much of his work is fantastic, but none of it is in fact sf [for full entry see The Encyclopedia of Fantasy under links below]. His second novel, The Wreckage of Agathon (1970), is a fantasy of history set in an anachronistic Sparta; his third, Grendel (1971), mordantly recasts the Beowulf legend from the Monster's point of view, and renders – more pointedly than ...

Cave, Peter

(1940-    ) UK author who has only occasionally published work in the fantastic, the first known examples being "Cry Martian" for Impulse in 1966 and "Scoop!" for Tit-Bits in 1967. From 1971 he wrote various sex novels as by Petra Christian, both solo and in collaboration with Christopher Priest, who also wrote solo novels under the name (though Priest does not acknowledge this work). Cave is known for three ties to the television series The New Avengers (1976-1977) (see The ...

Brémont, Anna, Comtesse de

(circa 1849-1922) US-born (of Irish parents) singer and author, mainly in South Africa after around 1878. She is of sf interest for A Son of Africa: A Romance (1899), mostly set in a remote African region governed by baboons (see Apes as Human); the young protagonist, whose mother is Black and father is white (see Race in SF), ends up in the UK after a natural Disaster has killed his mother and hurtled his father into an Underground world, where the Queen of Sheba (see She) predicts the ...

Bérard, Cyprien

(?   -?   ) French journalist and author of whom little is known, beyond his opportunistic rehash of John Polidori' s The Vampyre (1819), initially thought to have been written by Lord Byron, the real life model who most resembled its protagonist, and the fact that he has sometimes been confused with Charles Nodier. Lord Ruthwen ou Les Vampires (1820; trans Brian Stableford as The Vampire Lord Ruthwen 2011), for which Nodier wrote an introduction which does not in ...

Turk, H C

(1958-    ) US photographer, painter and author who began publishing sf with the comic adventure Ether Ore (1987), an Alternate History tale where the world has been transformed by the eponymous Power Source, which makes space travel cheap, and where a female "Hitler" is a force for peace. The exceedingly ambitious Black Body (1989) presents, in terms readable as both sf and fantasy, the autobiography of an eighteenth-century witch, during which she makes it clear that ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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