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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Trent, Gregory

One of several pseudonyms of US teacher, screenwriter and author Thames Ross Williamson (1894-1961), best known under his own name for a nonfantastic tale, Woods Colt (1933). His work of sf interest is restricted to Prehistoric SF tales for children, In the Stone Age: A Boy's Story of the Early Paleolithic Period (1937) and A Tamer of Beasts: A Boy's Story of the Early Neolithic Period (1938); their intent is didactic, though they are written with novelistic verve. Williamson's books as by ...

Greer, Gery

(1944-    ) US author, all of whose books have been written in collaboration with her husband, Bob Ruddick; her work is exclusively aimed at the younger end of the Young Adult market, and includes two series, the Max and Me sequence beginning with Max and Me and the Time Machine (1983) with Bob Ruddick, in which a piece of junk turns out to be a time machine that carries young Max (see Time Travel) into medieval England; and the Jason sequence beginning with Jason and the ...

Barlow, Joel

(1754-1812) US diplomat and author, mostly abroad, in France and the UK and elsewhere, from 1788. He is of sf interest for his book-length patriotic poem (see Poetry), The Vision of Columbus (1787; exp vt The Columbiad 1807), the first version of this narrative being a Christian, conservative, nationalistic attempt to create an American Myth of Origin [see The Encyclopedia of Fantasy under links below]. Between the publication of the two versions, Barlow became a supporter of the government ...

Hannan, Charles

(1863-1922) UK author whose first sf novel, The Betrothal of James (1898), attempts to extract some humour from the fact that female cats must be sacrificed in the production of a Rejuvenation pill. Thuka of the Moon (1906), which seems to have been inspired by the early work of Lord Dunsany, is a fantasy in which lunar deities amuse themselves by creating various humanlike beings, and awkwardly prefigures Philip José Farmer's World of Tiers Pocket-Universe sequence. In The Electric Man: ...

Locus Award

Popular Award voted on by readers of the leading sf news magazine (or Newszine) Locus, and presented annually since 1971. Each year's Locus awards normally honour work first published in the previous year. Thanks to their exceptionally wide reader base, these sf awards have come to share the stature of the Hugos (which reflect the preferences of fans and professionals who attend the annual Worldcon) and the Nebulas (which reflect the professional judgment but also sometimes the internal ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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