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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Craig, C W Thurlow

(1901-1985) UK author who served in World War One; his very Near Future sf novel, Plague Over London (1939), predicts that in World War Two, imminent at the time of writing, the Germans would employ nerve gas (see Poison) in an assault upon London. [JC]

Seiun Award

["Nebula Award"] The name for a set of genre prizes voted on by members of the annual Japanese Science Fiction Convention. These Awards take their name from the short-lived Seiun ["Nebula"], a single-issue magazine published by Tetsu Yano in 1954, and acknowledged as Japan's first. Despite the titular resemblance to the Nebula awards given by Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the convention-going fan-centred voting process and footprint of the Seiun Awards is more similar to that ...

Kingston, W H G

(1814-1880) UK author, almost solely for boys from 1850, more than 100 of his novels being juveniles, many of which expose his evangelical convictions; of these two are sf interest: Mark Seaworth: A Tale of the Indian Ocean (1852), a Lost Race tale; and At the South Pole: Or, the Adventures of Richard Pengelley, Mariner (1870), where the climate is unexpected. From 1853 until his death he was married to Agnes Kinloch Kingston, whose translations of Jules Verne and Johann Wyss were published ...

Sommerfeld, Adolf

(1870-1943) German journalist and author of a Future War novel, Frankreichs Ende im Jahre 19?? (1912; rev 1914; trans Louis G Redmont as How Germany Crushed France: (The Story of the Greatest Conspiracy in History) 1915), in which Germany, trusting safely in the neutrality of Britain and Russia, utterly defeats France in a very Near Future 1915. / Sommerfeld should not be confused with Adolf Sommerfeld (1886-1964), the building contractor who commissioned Walter Gropius (1883-1969) to ...

Ireland, David

(1927-    ) Australian author whose A Woman of the Future (1979), his best-known work of sf interest, depicts a bizarre but positively conceived set of futures through which his protagonist searches, and finds congenial. City of Women (1981), on the other hand, presents a Feminist vision of separatism whose ending befits its Alice in Wonderland style, as the vision turns out to be the hallucination of a lonely woman. Archimedes and the Seagle (1984), a fantasy, presents the ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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