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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Murphy, Warren

(1933-2015) US author, married to Molly Cochran, known largely for the Destroyer sequence, a long series of spoof thrillers, many with Richard Ben Sapir, featuring the Doc Savage-like adventures of Remo Williams, a White man (and avatar of Shiva the Destroyer) trained in the paranormal combat arts of Sinanju, which allow him (for instance) to interpenetrate his body with other matter (see Matter Penetration). The first titles were written mostly by Murphy and Sapir, who died in 1987, but later ...

Morressy, John

(1930-2006) US academic connected with Franklin Pierce College in New Hampshire from 1968, latterly as Writer Emeritus; and author who, After two nonfantastic novels, began his sf career in December 1971 with "Accuracy" for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, where most of his short fiction appeared. Morressy's early books were generally Space Opera, through which medium he constructed a series of interesting Alien societies, and most of them shared a common galactic background: a ...

Dangerous Visions

Original Anthology series edited by Harlan Ellison. Dangerous Visions (anth 1967), whose success inspired its successors, was a massive and influential anthology of 33 stories and copious prefatory material; it became strongly identified with the New Wave in the USA. Among its stories, "Aye, and Gomorrah ..." by Samuel R Delany, "Gonna Roll the Bones" by Fritz Leiber and "Riders of the Purple Wage" by Philip José Farmer won major awards, respectively a Nebula as best short story, a Hugo ...

Linaweaver, Brad

(1952-2019) US author who began publishing work of genre interest with "The Competitor" for Fantastic in July 1980, and who came to general notice with his first novel, Moon of Ice (March 1982 Amazing; exp 1988), set in an Alternate History where a Nazi-controlled Europe (see Hitler Wins) and a freedom-loving USA confront each other in a nuclear standoff. The original novella (itself revised in 1986) conveys considerable impact in its description of the confrontation between the supremely ...

Legendary Stardust Cowboy, The

US singer-songwriter, born Norman Carl Odam (1947-    ). Known to fans as "the Ledge", the Legendary Stardust Cowboy divides listeners into those who find his idiosyncratic and sporadic recordings to be nothing more than novelty records, and those who think very highly of his left-field, peculiar and space-travel-obsessed imagination. In the latter category is David Bowie, who has covered Legendary Stardust Cowboy songs on his own recordings. Tracks such as "I Took a Trip ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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