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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
Sponsor of the day: David J Lally

Kuttner, Henry

(1915-1958) US author, married to C L Moore from 1940 until his death; his childhood interest in Weird Tales early led him to correspond with H P Lovecraft and others: his first sale to the magazine was a poem, "Ballad of the Gods", in February 1936, followed by "The Graveyard Rats" (March 1936 Weird Tales). His stories for the magazine included a Robert E Howard-like Sword-and-Sorcery series collected as Elak of Atlantis (stories May 1938-January 1941 Weird Tales; coll of linked stories 1985). ...

Taboos

The Polynesian word "tabu", from which the English term is taken, was first recorded in 1777 by Captain James Cook (1728-1779) near the end of his last tour of the South Pacific on behalf of the expanding British empire; unsurprisingly perhaps, the word "taboo" was initially applied by early anthropologists to representative of other, exotic, "inferior" cultures: white civilization had evolved beyond taboo (see Evolution). Within that frame of application, the term was early on defined as ...

Duvernois, Henri

Pseudonym of French screenwriter, playwright and author Henri-Simon Schwabacher (1875-1937), prolific in various genres. Of sf interest is L'Homme s'est retrouvé (1936; trans Brian Stableford as The Man Who Found Himself 2010), a very early example of interstellar travel, by realistically described Starship, in the French tradition of the Scientific Romance. The journey to Proxima Centauri at the speed of light terminates on a planet exactly like the Earth forty years prior (making the ...

Toki o Kakeru Shōjo

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, based on a novel by Yasutaka Tsutsui is one of the staples of Young Adult science fiction in Japan. First serialized in magazines for third-year middle-school and first-year high-school students in 1965, it has been novelized, rewritten, and adapted into many variants in the ensuing decades, each displaying unique features of the zeitgeist. As with James Cameron's Terminator (1984), it has a story that lends itself well to low-budget film-making, utilizing ...

Féval fils, Paul

(1860-1933) French author, best known for his adaptations and continuations of the work of his father, Paul Féval, beginning in 1893. He was relatively unprolific in the sf field, though Félifax (1929-1933 2vols [see Checklist for separate volumes]; trans Brian Stableford as Felifax the Tiger Man 2007) is about a Tarzan-like protagonist whose near-Superhero powers come into play – and manifest themselves in physiological changes – only when he is intensely aroused. The ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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