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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
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Ramsden, Lewis

Pseudonym of A L Dowling (?   -?   ), UK author of The Temple of Fire (1905), a Lost Race tale whose contemporary protagonists are directed to a mysterious Island in the South Atlantic by a "Strange Letter Found in a Copper Vessel" from Elizabethan times, and find there a civilization descended from ancient Persia; an even more ancient civilization, having suffered racial Devolution, haunts the Underground caverns beneath the island in Apes as Human guise. Though ...

Fryers, Austin

Pseudonym of UK trade unionist, playwright and author William Edward Clery (1861-1931), whose activism in his public life cost him more than one job for political reasons; his first novel of interest, The Devil and the Inventor (1900), bridges sf and fantasy (the term Equipoise, here normally used for works whose relationship to the genres they transact is retrospective rather than proleptic, could easily be applied to this tale): an amateur scientist enlists the aid of the devil – ...

MacDonald, Robert MacLaughlan

(1874-1942) Scots author and prospector who spent some years looking for gold in Australia and New Guinea and has been wrongly identified as Australian. His Lost Race novels include The Moon God's Secret: A Tale of the Tropical Pacific (1905), in which white explorers encounter decayed relics of an advanced ancient race (see Devolution); The Gold-Seekers: A Tale of Adventure: A Gold-Extracting Motor and the Sahara Desert (1910), in which an Invention helps a young lad gain riches in the Sahara ...

Dixon, Franklin W

Perhaps the most famous House Name of the Stratemeyer Syndicate (see Edward Stratemeyer), used by Leslie McFarlane for his contributions to the Hardy Boys sequence and by Harriet Stratemeyer Adams and others; rare items of genre interest in this series include The Disappearing Floor (1940) by John Button (whom see), The Firebird Rocket (1978) and The Hardy Boys: Ghost Stories (coll 1984). Two other early titles of possible interest are from the Ted Scott Flying Stories sequence: Castaways of ...

Stead, C K

(1932-    ) New Zealand poet, academic and author whose acerbic, well crafted novels have received considerable praise. Of some sf interest is his first: Smith's Dream (1971; rev 1973) depicts a tyrannical Dystopia, and a Near Future Vietnam-like conflict set in New Zealand, with an ending harshened in the revised edition; it was filmed as Sleeping Dogs (1977) (see New Zealand). My Name Was Judas (2006) verges on Alternate History, using the recollections of a ...

Robinson, Roger

(1943-    ) UK computer programmer, bibliographer and publisher, active in UK Fandom for many years. The Writings of Henry Kenneth Bulmer (1983 chap; rev 1984 chap) is an exhaustive Bibliography of one of the most prolific sf writers, and Who's Hugh?: An SF Reader's Guide to Pseudonyms (1987) is similarly exhaustive in its listing of Pseudonyms. Criticized at first for its failure to annotate its findings – so that, for instance, pseudonyms used for sf could not be ...



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