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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
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Maya

British Fanzine, 15 issues from 1970 to 1978, edited from Newcastle-upon-Tyne by Ian Williams (#1-#2, Autumn 1970-April 1971), Ian Maule (#3-#6, April 1972-September 1974), and Rob Jackson (#7-#15, February 1975-June 1978). Duplicated on UK quarto paper #1-#8, lithographed A4 thereafter. / Under its third and final editor Rob Jackson, a doctor, Maya became one of Britain's leading sf fanzines, attractively produced, circulated worldwide and containing a variety of material on sf and Fandom. ...

Jeapes, Ben

(1965-    ) UK author who began publishing work of genre interest with "Digital Cats Come Out Tonight" (in Digital Dreams, anth 1990, ed David V Barrett), and who has since published frequently in Interzone. His novels have been directed to Young Adult markets, and include the His Majesty's Spaceship sequence comprising His Majesty's Spaceship (1998; vt The Ark 2000) and The Xenocide Mission (2002), in which a generally rational human race is brought into an intergalactic ...

Coombs, Charles I

(1914-1994) US author, usually known as Chick Coombs, who in 1941 modelled John Carter of Mars for John Coleman Burroughs's Sunday-newspaper comics strip of that name (see Edgar Rice Burroughs). Coombs's written output was almost exclusively of nonfiction books for Young Adult readers, a high proportion of them about flying. Of sf interest are at least two tales, Celestial Space, Inc (1954) and Mystery of Satellite 7 (1958), both of which dramatically espouse the virtues of venturing into ...

Medicine

Medical applications of Technology comprise one of the few areas where the cutting edge of scientific research impinges directly and intimately upon ordinary human life. New medicines are so rapidly brought into everyday use that it is easy to forget how rapid progress has been, and that barely 100 years separates us from the crucial Conceptual Breakthroughs associated with the development of organic chemistry and the germ theory enunciated by Louis Pasteur (1822-1895). Even people who can find ...

Stuart, Francis

(1902-2000) Australian-born poet, playwright, journalist and author, in Ireland from infancy; in 1918, he married Iseult Gonne (1894-1954), daughter of Maud Gonne MacBride (1866-1953), and remained active in the IRA and in Irish politics until World War Two, which he spent in Germany as an Irish neutral, partly to continue his advocacy of Irish interests. This period – anatomized with chill brilliance in Black List, Section H (1971), his most famous single novel – shaped perceptions ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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