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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Carey, C J

Pseudonym of Venezuelan-born journalist and author Jane Thynne (1961-    ), in the UK from childhood; married to Philip Kerr until his death in 2018. Her fiction under her own name is nonfantastic; she is best known for the Clara Vine series of thrillers set in Germany before World War Two [not listed below]. She is of sf interest for Widowland (2021) as by C J Carey, an Alternate History Hitler Wins tale set in the occupied Dystopian Britain of 1953, whose Protector, Alfred ...

Day the Earth Caught Fire, The

Film (1961). British Lion/Pax/Universal. Produced and directed by Val Guest. Cast includes Arthur Christiansen, Edward Judd, Leo McKern and Janet Munro. Written by Wolf Mankowitz, Guest. 99 minutes, cut to 90 minutes (US). Black and white. / Val Guest, who had made The Quatermass Xperiment (1956) and other sf/horror films for Hammer in the 1950s, excelled himself with this intelligent Disaster movie. After a framing scene, in which reporter Peter Stenning (Judd) walks through the deserted ...

Greenhough, Terry

Working name of UK author Terence Greenhough (1944-2002) for most of his fiction, though he used the pseudonym Andrew Lester for the routine novel The Thrice-Born (1976), about persecuted hermaphrodites on a distant planet. Greenhough began publishing sf with "The Tree in the Forest" for Science Fiction Monthly in 1974. After Friend of Pharaoh (1975), an historical romance, his first sf novel, Time and Timothy Grenville (1975), typically of this writer somewhat discursively exploits an uneasy, ...

FTL [magazine]

1. Irish Amateur Magazine published by the Irish Science Fiction Association, Dublin with a succession of editors, starting and ending with John Kenny (#1-#2, #11), plus David Egan (#3-#4), Michael Carroll (#5-#6), David Egan (#7-#8) and Robert Elliott (#9-#10). It ran from March 1989 to Winter (December) 1991 ending (from issue #9 Summer 1991) as a trim, A4-size, glossy magazine of 28 rather packed pages. It was rare for Eire to have its own magazine and the contents were soon filled with ...

Numa Shōzō

Pseudonym of a controversial Japanese author, whose identity was never confirmed, but believed by many, including the National Library of Japan, to be a pen-name for Tetsuo Amano (1926-2008), an editor at the Shinchōsha publishing house. Amano once admitted to being Numa, but later retracted his confession. Other candidates, largely discounted, have included the authors Tatsuhiko Shibusawa and Ryūichi Tamura, as well as Yukio Mishima, who publicly praised Numa's best-known book, ...

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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