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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 17 January 2022
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Dillard, R H W

(1937-    ) US poet, academic and author of at least two full-length fictions (see Equipoise; Fabulation) that can be thought of in sf terms, though his only work of strong sf interest was his collaboration with George Garrett and John Rodenbeck on the script for the film Frankenstein Meets the Spacemonster (1965; vt Mars Invades Puerto Rico; vt Duel of the Space Monsters) directed by Robert Gaffney (see Frankenstein). The Book of Changes (1974) almost deliriously ...

Hornig, Charles D

(1916-1999) US editor whose career began in September 1933 when, as a young sf fan, he started a Fanzine called The Fantasy Fan: The Fans' Own Magazine (see Amateur Magazine), and happened to send a copy of it to Hugo Gernsback. By coincidence, Gernsback was at that time looking for a new managing editor for Wonder Stories, and was so impressed by Hornig's editorial that he decided to offer him the post. At seventeen, Hornig became the youngest-ever sf magazine editor, attending evening classes ...

Longstreth, T Morris

(1886-1975) US author active from 1915 or earlier; of sf interest is a late juvenile (see Children's SF) tale, Time Flight (1954), in which two contemporary young men are Timeslipped into seventeenth-century Salem at the time of the witch trials, and find themselves in danger. [JC]

Smeaton, Oliphant

(1856-1914) Scottish editor and author in whose Lost Race tale for boys, A Mystery of the Pacific (1899), three young Englishmen searching for a lost relative penetrate a mysterious Sargasso Sea-like barrier in the South Pacific and are taken in a trireme to a giant Island inhabited – they think exclusively – by descendants of ancient Romans. As the plot thickens, however, they discover Underground a second, far more ancient civilization comprising survivors of Atlantis. The three ...

God is An Astronaut

Irish three-piece band, whose instrumental albums generate a spacy, evocative atmosphere non-specifically reminiscent of sf, an effect underscored by their track titles: "Fall from the Stars" on The End of the Beginning (2002), "Infinite Horizons" and "Suicide by Star" on All Is Violent, All Is Bright (2005). The eponymously-titled album God Is an Astronaut (2007) is their most cohesive and emotionally effective, and traces an oblique science-fictional narrative that takes the listener beyond ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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