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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Fifth Element, The

Film (1997). Gaumont. Directed by Luc Besson. Costumes by Jean-Paul Gaultier. Written by Luc Besson and Robert Mark Kamen. Cast includes Maïwenn Besco, Ian Holm, Mila Jovovich, Gary Oldman, Chris Tucker and Bruce Willis. 126 minutes. Colour. / 1914. An archaeologist discovers strange hieroglyphs in a hidden Egyptian tomb. Deciphered, they indicate that the Underground chamber has for almost 5000 years concealed a great Weapon consisting of four stones that manifest the normal four ...

Shedley, Ethan I

Pseudonym of Belgian-born software engineer and author Boris Beizer (1934-2018), in the US from May 1941; most of his publications [not listed below] concern computer system architecture and software testing. In his novel Earth Ship and Star Song (1979) the survivors of destructive Climate Change escape from the Ruined Earth, but while developing their Faster Than Light Starship drive inadvertently create a Black Hole that destroys a solar system and its Telepathic inhabitants; humans are then ...

Wood, Charlotte

(1965-    ) Australian author whose work has generally been nonfantastic. Of sf interest is The Natural Way of Things (2015), set in a very Near Future Dystopian Australia and centering on a group of women first drugged (see Drugs) then forcibly confined to a Keep deep in the outback. They discover that they are being punished (see Feminism; Women in SF; Sex) for the sin of behaving "badly" with powerful men. A Slingshot Ending leaves no surety over their possible release. ...

Wooding, Chris

(1977-    ) UK author, usually for the Young Adult market, and usually fantasy or horror, including his first novel, Catchman (1998). His most successful singleton is probably The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray (2001), whose Amnesia-ridden protagonist possesses unknowingly the key to understanding a post-Pandemic crime-ridden London threatened by magically infected "wych-kin" and by the invocation of cosmic unpleasantness reminiscent of the Cthulhu Mythos. Wooding's first three ...

Duff, Douglas V

(1901-1978) Argentinian-born author of UK parents, in the UK from 1906. His service in both World Wars (in 1916 as a naval cadet who had his ship sunk under him), and his inter-war career in the Palestine Police, mark him as a Young Adult writer with nothing to prove about his own manliness; it may (or may not) be consequential upon his personal experience of the world that his work is (almost uniquely in his generation of writers) free of racial or sexual stereotyping: women are active and ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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