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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 15 August 2022
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DeSoto, Rafael

(1904-1992) Puerto Rican-born US artist, whose name was variously rendered as Raphael De Soto, Rafael M de Soto, and R de Soto; he may have produced a few pulp covers under the name Irene Endris. After the death of his father, DeSoto was sent to a Catholic seminary, but his obvious artistic talents directed him toward a career in art rather than the priesthood. In about 1923 he came to New York and spent some years getting what experience he could in various studios before, in 1930, signing up ...

Parry, David MacLean

(1852-1915) US businessman and author whose anti-socialist Dystopia, The Scarlet Empire (1906), is clearly intended to counter Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward (1888). A young socialist American thinks to commit suicide by jumping into the sea, but awakens in a nightmarish Atlantis, a Lost World Keep protected from the ocean above by a great dome, where – despite a healthy plethora of convenient Inventions – the obsession with regimented equality leads to grotesqueries prophetic of ...

Crampton, Patricia

(1925-2016) Indian-born translator, in UK from 1930. As chair of the Translators Association, she contributed importantly to the argument that translators were essential contributors to the world of literature in general, and that in specific they should not be asked to work for flat rates, without hope of royalties, or of sharing revenues from the PLR (Public Lending Right) after it was created in the UK in 1979. After working as a translator in 1947 at the Nuremberg trials of Germans accused ...

Cochrane, William E

(1926-1993) US author who began publishing sf with "How High on the Ladder?" for Fantasy Book #7 in 1950, writing as Leo Paige. As S Kye Boult from 1971 – a name inspired by his work for Douglas Aircraft on the Skybolt air-to-air missile – and also under his own name from 1973, he began to publish in Analog the hard-edged sf adventures, like "Whalekiller Grey" (October 1973 Analog), for which he became better known. Class Six Climb (1980), told from the viewpoint of a giant ...

Seidel, Peter

(1926-    ) US architect, planner and author, much of his work in the first two capacities focusing on the Ecological crises of the past half-century. His first nonfiction book, Invisible Walls: Why We Ignore the Damage We Inflict on the Planet ... and Ourselves (1998; rev 2001), directly addresses these issues. The Futures Studies implications of this text are dramatized, at points despairingly, in 2045: A Story of our Future (2009), a Dystopian vision of the fate of the ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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