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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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SFX

UK magazine, current, #1 June 1995 (published 25 May), letter-sized (A4), perfect bound, continuously numbered, on slick paper throughout, initially monthly but usually 13 times yearly from 1996 with the additional non-month issue variously dated "Christmas", "Spring" or "Summer". SFX is published by Future Publishing and was edited by Matt Bielby to #11, April 1996; then by former deputy editor Dave Golder to #132, July 2005; from #133 by Dave Bradley (though Golder returned while Bradley took ...

Wood, Mrs J

Pseudonym of US journalist, editor and author William Mill Butler (1857-1946); in his anti-Feminist Dystopia, Pantaletta: A Romance of Sheheland (1882) as by Mrs J Wood, the narrator, Icarus Byron Gullible (see Gulliver), having traveled to the North Pole in an Airship of his own Invention, discovers a Symmes-style Hollow Earth society governed by a female tyrant; men are forced to cross-dress and shave, and the Satire soon becomes heavy. Butler himself claimed to have subsequently changed his ...

Hanley, James

(1901-1985) Irish author, in the UK from around 1908, whose prolific output – beginning with Drift (1930) – focused on raw tales of life at sea, and upon sometimes grim novels about working-class life in Britain, a savagery of address almost certainly effected in part through his long immersion in World War One; he enlisted early, was gassed and invalidated out of the army, and returned to war work as a stoker on ships carrying troops. Boy (1932), about sexual violence inflicted on ...

Space Opera

A popular item of sf Terminology, echoing the practice (dating from the 1920s) of referring to Westerns as "horse operas", and more immediately the term "soap operas" (from 1938) for never-ending Radio series: when Radio was the principal medium of home entertainment in the USA, daytime serials intended for housewives were often sponsored by soap-powder companies, and hence the nickname. "Soap opera" was quickly generalized to refer to any corny domestic drama. The pattern was extended into sf ...

Green, Terence M

(1947-    ) Canadian teacher and author who began publishing work of genre interest with "Of Children in the Foliage" in Aurora: New Canadian Writing 1979 (anth 1979) edited by Morris Wolfe; the story was gathered with further lean and subtle tales in The Woman Who Is the Midnight Wind (coll 1987). In his short fiction Green, like many Canadian writers, tenders a vision which might be called melancholy humanism. His first novel, Barking Dogs (1988) and its sequel Blue Limbo ...

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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