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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 10 January 2022
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Emanuel, Walter

(1869-1915) UK solicitor and author mostly active around the turn of the century in the short-lived English humour magazine, The Butterfly, the first of whose dog books was A Dog Day or The Angel in the House (1902), a diary kept by a dog. Of some sf interest is One Hundred Years Hence: Being Some Extracts from the Hourly Mail of A.D. 2000 (1911 chap), which comprises a spoof newspaper by means of which mild aspersions are cast on contemporary life, a mode of Satire modestly popular in ...

de Listonai, Mr

Attributed pseudonym of French author Daniel Jost de Villeneuve, whose full name may have been Daniel Jost de Villeneuve de Listonai (17??-17??); his Proto SF tale, Le Voyageur Philosophe dans un Pays Inconnu aux Inhabitants de la Terre (1761 2vols; trans Brian Stableford as The Philosophic Voyager in an Island Unknown to the Inhabitants of Earth 2015), carries its protagonist by space ship to the Moon, where he discovers a Utopia run on strictly rational lines from the City of Selenopolis. The ...

Cabet, Étienne

(1788-1856) French lawyer, philosopher, utopian socialist and author, best known for the narrative Utopia, Voyage et Aventures de Lord Villiam Carisdall en Icarie (1839 2vols; vt Voyage en Icarie: roman philosophique et social 1842; trans Leslie J Roberts as Travels in Icaria 2003) [for more details see Checklist below]. The eponymous Lord Carisdall, a member of the British nobility, travels by ship (the journey takes four months) to a vast promontory known as Icaria, whose 100 provinces are ...

Waugh, Evelyn

(1903-1966) UK author, known mostly for a series of black inter-War Satires, such as Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), and for Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder (1945). Some of his early novels utilize imaginary African countries for satirical purposes; in Black Mischief (1932), the Azanian Empire occupies a great Island very similar to Madagascar, and in Scoop (1938), the inland dominion of Ishmaelia, in part as remote as any ...

Hugi, Maurice G

(1904-1947) UK author who began publishing work of genre interest in 1934 with "Temple of Doom" (26 May 1934 Scoops) and "The Mines of Haldar" for (23 June 1934 Scoops); he is perhaps best known for "The Mechanical Mice" (January 1941 Astounding), which may have been written entirely by Eric Frank Russell; "The Mill of the Gods" (July 1946 New Worlds) is a competent tale about goods of Alien manufacture flooding Earth's markets. Hugi is also credited with the posthumous publication of a routine ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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