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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Cravens, Gwyneth

(?   -    ) US author of The Black Death (1977) with John S Marr, then head of the New York City Bureau of Preventible Diseases, about a Near Future Disaster in which the eponymous plague (see Pandemic) is transmitted unknowingly by a young woman; it was filmed as Quiet Killer (1992). Speed of Light: The Adventures of Ella Speed (1979) carries a young woman in rebellion against "civilized" urban culture into an occultish-group whose mind-control techniques ...

Davies, Hugh Sykes

(1909-1984) UK critical theorist, surrealist, Communist (until 1956), poet (in the Apocalyptic movement founded by Henry Treece), and author whose surrealist book-length Petron: A Prose Poem (1935) is, at least retroactively, of some value to sf writers and readers as an early model for contemporary attempts at the rendering of Inner Space. The Papers of Andrew Melmoth (1960) is an interesting story about the Evolution of Intelligence in rats, quite different, in its quiet literary tone, from ...

Schumacher, Tony

(circa 1968-    ) UK journalist and author whose Hitler Wins sequence, the John Rossett series, comprising The Darkest Hour (2014) and The British Lion (2015), is set in a 1946 London under Nazi occupation; the widowed protagonist, after distinguished service in the defeated forces, is seconded to the Office of Jewish Affairs, under control of the new rulers. His job, which is to apprehend any remaining Jews, is depicted through thriller tropes; his emotional ties to young ...

McKimmey, James, Jr

(1923-2011) US author who, after serving in World War Two, began publishing work of genre interest with "Tergiversation" in The Avalonian (only issue, 1952), publishing around twenty sf stories over the next fifteen years for journals including Galaxy, If and Planet Stories. Much of his work during his career, which lasted until 1994, was nonfantastic; his last sf story was "The Inspector" in The Farthest Reaches: 12 Never-Before-Published Tales of Intergalactic Space (anth 1968) edited by ...

Donaldson, Stephen R

(1947-    ) US author who remains best known for his three formidably ambitious Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever high-fantasy sequences, the first two of which established him as a Fantasy writer of central importance in the 1970s and 1980s [for detailed commentary see The Encyclopedia of Fantasy under links below]. He was the winner of the John W Campbell Award for most promising new writer in 1979. In Mordant's Need, a fantasy diptych comprising The Mirror of ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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