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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 25 November 2022
Sponsor of the day: Joe Haldeman

Donnelly, Lara Elena

(?   -    ) US author who began to publish work of genre interest with "The Witches of Athens" in Strange Horizons for October 2013. Her first novel, Amberlough (2017), is a noir thriller set in an Alternate World whose eponymous capital City, which in some aspects resembles Weimar Berlin, is under threat from the radical right (see ...

Gerhardi, William

(1895-1977) Russian-born author of English parents, in the UK from before World War One; in later, inactive years he gave his name as Gerhardie, apparently in homage to an earlier more prestigious spelling. He is best known for works outside the sf field like Futility (1922) and The Polyglots (1925). His End-of-the-World novel Jazz and Jasper: The Story of Adams and Eva (1928; vt ...

Weekley, Ian

(1933-2014) UK teacher and author, who should not be confused with the artist and modeller Ian Weekley (1932-2005). His sf novel, The Moving Snow (1974), rather prosaically describes how a family copes with a Climate Change crisis that brings severe Arctic conditions to the UK. All in all they survive snugly (see Cosy Catastrophe). [JC]

Stanton, Will

(1918-1996) US humorous author for various Slicks including The New Yorker, Readers Digest and Saturday Evening Post. His contributions to SF Magazines began with "Barney" for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in February 1951 and remained with that magazine exclusively. He was active for twelve years, his eleven stories being witty and ...

Tarnacre, Robert

Pseudonym of UK author Robert Cartmell (1877-?   ) in whose Lost Race tale, Beyond the Swamps (1929), a British patrol boat explores an unknown backwater, upstream from which an intact ancient Roman civilization discovered, and is soon brought to heel under the civilizing influence of Empire discipline. [JC]

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos ...



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