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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Douglas, Iain

(?   -    ) UK author of whom nothing is known beyond his authorship of four sf adventures for Robert Hale Limited, beginning with Point of Impact (1979). [JC]

Ashby, Richard

(?   -    ) US author who began publishing fiction of genre interest with "A Joke for Harry" for Amazing in September 1949, and who was published short fiction actively for several years. His sf novel, Act of God (December 1951-January 1952 Other Worlds; exp 1971), concerns a conspiracy in 2002 to deprive the one man who has gained Immortality of his powerful gift. [JC]

Morimi Tomihiko

(1979-    ) Writing name of a Japanese author whose work bridges many trends in Japan, including concentrations on studied, commodified "cute", contemporary romance, postmodernism (see Postmodernism and SF) and the Media Landscape. / A master's graduate in Agriculture from Kyōto University, Morimi was first published while still a student, and continues to draw deeply on the experience of living in the City that was Japan's capital for a thousand years before 1868, ...

Becker, Kurt

(1916-2010) US priest born in Venezuela with a German father; in the USA from 1924, applied for naturalization in 1946. His sf novel is the a Young Adult Countdown! (1958), whose protagonist worries whether or not he'll make the Mars flight; he does. [JC/SH]

Wheeler-Nicholson, Malcolm

(1890-1968) US magazine entrepreneur, prolific producer of pulp fiction important in the history of Comics as the founder of the firm which became DC Comics; and author. Death Over London (1940) is uninteresting sf featuring Nazi spies destroying American installations in London with sympathetic vibrations. [RB]

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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