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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Bray, John Francis

(1809-1897) US author, in the UK 1822-1842; he published several economic tracts, some of them radical, like his first, Labour's Wrongs and Labour's Remedy (1839). Of sf interest is A Voyage from Utopia to Several Unknown Regions of the World: by Yarbfg: Translated from the American (written 1841-1842; 1957), which anticipated William Dean Howells's technique of presenting the views of a visitor from the Utopia, which is located in an unknown Archipelago. The narrator visits various civilized ...

Kitchell, Joseph Gray

(1862-1945) US businessman, photographer and author, whose early novella, The Story of the "Kranbach Nocturne" (1905 chap), treats the eponymous Basilisk as soul-saving. His full-length sf novel, The Earl of Hell (1924), combines high adventure – its protagonist travels the world in search of new sources of radium, is kidnapped, foils a plot to supply "Hunovia" (i.e. Germany) with a brand-new Power Source – and an informed discussion of the potentialities of new forms of energy. ...

Doolittle, Sean

(1971-    ) US author almost exclusively of crime thrillers; of some sf interest is Kill Monster (2019), in which a 150-year old Golem, excavated in Steampunk fashion from a landlocked ship in Kansas, continues its mission to execute a now-long-dead criminal, fastening its attention on the criminal's descendant. The action is compactly spoofish. [JC]

Hunter, Evan

One of the first pseudonyms and from 1952 the adopted legal name of US author born Salvatore Albert Lombino (1926-2005), who ultimately became better known as Ed McBain, under which byline he wrote at least over fifty laconic police procedurals as well as some action-detections in the John D MacDonald mould. All in all, Hunter/McBain published about 150 books. As Hunter he is most famous for novels like The Blackboard Jungle (1954) and Strangers When We Meet (1958); his later career had little ...

Sidewise Award

These annual awards for Alternate History fiction were conceived in 1995 by Evelyn C Leeper, Robert B Schmunk and Steven H Silver, and have since been presented annually in two categories, Long Form for works of more than 60,000 words and Short Form for works (including poems) of less than 60,000 words. The awards' name is a homage to Murray Leinster's short Timeslip/Parallel Worlds story "Sidewise in Time" (June 1934 Astounding). / The winners below are listed by their year of eligibility, ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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