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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
Sponsor of the day: David J Lally

Utopias

The concept of a utopia or "Ideal State" is linked to religious ideas of Heaven or the Promised Land and to folkloristic ideas like the Isles of the Blessed, but it is essentially a future-historical goal, to be achieved by the active efforts of human beings, not a transcendental goal reserved as a reward for those who follow a particularly virtuous path in life. The term was coined by Thomas More in Utopia (Latin edition 1516; trans 1551; many editions since), although More's work has far more ...

Clark, Simon

(1958-    ) UK author, principally of Horror, who began to publish work of genre interest with "A Letter from John Shaw" in Dark Dreams #2 for Spring 1985 and has been a prolific author of short fiction ever since, with many of his stories (often set in his native Yorkshire) assembled as collections beginning with Blood & Grit (coll 1990; exp vt Blood and Grit 21 2011) [for further titles see Checklist below]. His first novel was the horror tale Nailed by the Heart ...

Relativity

Overall name for the theories of space-time Physics formulated by Albert Einstein (1869-1955): special relativity, proposed in 1905, and general relativity, proposed in 1916. Both theories, though initially controversial, have been exhaustively tested by experiment. / In special relativity it is axiomatic that there is no absolute or "privileged" frame of reference against which velocity can be measured: only the relative velocity of any given two bodies is meaningful. A second axiom is ...

Jackson, G Gibbard

(1877-1935) UK author, usually of tales for boys on aeronautical subjects, and of nonfiction about air travel and other related topics; of sf interest is Arctic Air Terror (1937), a Lost Race tale set in the Yukon Territory. Within a caldera heated by volcanic action, a technologically advanced but priest-ridden civilization of "white Indians", originally from ancient Egypt, uses its helicopter-like airships and strange Weapons to attempt to protect its gold from the outer world. Unusually for ...

Upward, Allen

(1863-1926) UK politician, barrister, poet and author, an advocate from early manhood of various nationalist movements, including Irish Home Rule and Greek independence; his poetry, of erratic quality but adventurous, was variously assembled, and some poems were published in Des Imagistes: an Anthology (anth 1914 chap) edited by Ezra Pound (1885-1972). Three articles with the overtitle "The Order of the Seraphim" (1910 The New Age) advocated – in terms of his understanding of the concept ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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