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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Tayler, Kassy

(?   -    ) US author, possibly pseudonymous, of the Young Adult Steampunk Dystopian Ashes of Twilight sequence beginning with Ashes of Twilight (2012), set in a clockwork-governed Underground world with Pocket Universe elements, run on tyrannically authoritarian lines and in fear of the open air above. In the process of demonstrating that "the sky is blue", the young protagonist finds herself and love, and quests adventurously. Outdoors is not all she ...

Meyers, Roy

(1910-1974) UK practising physician and author whose first sf novel, The Man They Couldn't Kill (1944), introduces the vastly talented Dr D'eath, a Superman capable of inducing Hypnotic trances at a distance and of scientifically arranging for souls to take out-of-body excursions. Falsely convicted of a murder, D'eath clears his name and might have starred in a sequence of Doc Savage-like adventures had the book been successful. Meyers is best known for the later Dolphin series about the ...

van Herck, Paul

(1938-1989) Belgian (Flemish) author whose Sam, of de Pluterdag (1968; trans Danny De Laet and Willy Magiels as Where Were You Last Pluterday? 1973) is a Satire of a society in which the higher classes have access to an extra day of the week. Van Herck also wrote a collection of ingenious short stories, De Cirkels en andere fantastische verhalen ["The Circles"] (coll 1965). [JC] see also: Benelux. /

Titterton, W R

(1876-1963) UK journalist, biographer, poet and author, perhaps best known for his long friendship and professional association with G K Chesterton, which he commemorated in a biography, G K Chesterton: A Portrait (1947). He also published a life of George Bernard Shaw, So This Is Shaw (1945 chap). The title tale assembled in The Death Ray Dictator and Other Stories (coll 1946) is a Near Future adventure set in 1960 and involving the eponymous Death Ray. [JC]

Barton, William R

(1950-    ) US author who has concentrated for most of his career on sf novels set in Space Opera arenas; within this normally expansive frame, he tends to focus on intimate venues, where stressful interactions amongst sometimes dysfunctional characters give a dark, closet-drama feel to his tales. His first novel, however, Hunting on Kunderer (1973), traditionally confronts humans with Alien natives on a dangerous new planet; A Plague of All Cowards (1976 dos) was also an sf ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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