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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Connington, J J

Pseudonym for all his fiction of Scots author and chemistry professor Alfred Walter Stewart (1880-1947), coiner of the term "isobar" in the sense which (complementing "isotope") describes elements of the same atomic weight but with different atomic numbers. As a writer, he is best known for his 25 detective novels and for his one sf novel, Nordenholt's Million (1923). An early story of world-Disaster being surmounted, it is realistic, reasoned, sociologically observed and credible. ...

Salwi, Dilip M

(1952-2004) Indian author, almost exclusively of work for Young Adult and younger readers. He wrote much nonfiction, including Our Scientists (1986), containing biographies of Indian scientists, and Nonsense in Indian Science (1998). His sf was clearly directed, though with pleasing tact, towards educational purposes, with Alien characters introduced in considerable part in order to comment on the state of our planet; this work is generally set in the Near Future. Titles include Fire on the ...

James, Donald

Working name of UK scriptwriter and author Donald James Wheal (1931-2008), who also wrote as James Barwick and Thomas Dresden. His work as a scriptwriter for Television series began about 1964; of sf interest were scripts for programmes like Space: 1999, and for individual films like Gerry Anderson's Doppelganger (1999). His first novel of sf interest, The Fall of the Russian Empire (1982), is a Near Future thriller about the end of the USSR; the Inspector Vadim sequence, comprising Monstrum ...

Carr, Wallace

Pseudonym of UK author Reginald Aubrey Gibbin (1890-1973), mostly of romances for teenage girls, active from around 1930; he is of some sf interest for The Grotto of Arratsu (1940), whose two young protagonists discover a Lost Race on an unknown Island in the Atlantic Ocean, where great gates in the eponymous Underground grotto once opened the way to Atlantis and continue to block the flood waters responsible for its immersion. [JC]

XYZ

Pseudonym of the unidentified UK author (?   -?   ) of The Vril Staff (1891), an unauthorized Sequel by Other Hands to Edward Bulwer Lytton's The Coming Race (1871), in which vril is the Power Source for a vastly effective Weapon, whose wielder initially eliminates Indians in the American West, and then, as the tale ricochets into the Near Future, acts as a regulator of internecine European warfare. The novel, erratically, turns into an overexcited Future History. ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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