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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 15 August 2022
Sponsor of the day: John Howard

Authentic Science Fiction

UK magazine. 85 issues, 1 January 1951 to October 1957, published by Hamilton & Co, Stafford, fortnightly to #8 then monthly, issues numbered consecutively, no volume numbers; edited by L G Holmes (Gordon Landsborough) (January 1951-November 1952), H J Campbell (December 1952-January 1956) and E C Tubb (February 1956-October 1957). Pocketbook-size January 1951-February 1957, Digest-size March-October 1957. #1 and #2 were entitled Authentic Science Fiction Series, #3-#8 Science Fiction ...

Magroon, Vector

Pseudonym thought to belong to the UK author and editor Julian Franklyn (1899-1970), who also wrote on the occult and parapsychology, and is said to have written both sf and crime for the publishers Scion while an editor there. A single sf novel appeared under the Magroon byline, the Space Flight adventure Burning Void (1952). The frequent identification of this pseudonym as John Russell Fearn's is definitely incorrect. [DRL]

Kilroy-Silk, Robert

(1942-    ) UK broadcaster, politician (Labour MP 1974-1986) and occasional author, prominent in the first two roles for a volatility, ambition, party-changing episodes, and a growing Euroscepticism; he has often been lampooned in the media. His sf novel, The Ceremony of Innocence: A Novel of 1984 (1983), set in the very Near Future, reflects these tendencies and convictions. [JC]

Dick, Philip K

(1928-1982) US author, one of the most important figures in twentieth-century Genre SF and an author of general significance. He is a figure who helps define by contrast those identified in this Encyclopedia as Mainstream Writers of SF: writers, that is, whose comprehension of the significant literatures of the last century has sometimes seemed less than full. An author like Thomas Pynchon, who is not described in this encyclopedia as mainstream, will understand what he owes Dick; a mainstream ...

Neill, A S

(1883-1973) UK educationist who gained fame for revolutionary theories about the teaching of children and who cofounded the International School – which operated initially on the Continent from 1921, then (from 1924) under the name Summerhill in the UK – to put them into practice. Fictionalized accounts like A Dominie's Log (1916) and its sequels popularized his arguments, and his sf novel, The Last Man Alive (1938), was read aloud to his pupils. The Disaster (see Last Man) it ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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