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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Chiang, Ted

(1967-    ) US author who has produced several stories since he began to publish work of genre interest with "Tower of Babylon" for Omni in November 1990, which won the first of his four Nebula awards to date, for best novelette; he also received the John W Campbell Award for best new writer in 1992. His second Nebula was for "Story of Your Life" (in Starlight 2, anth 1998, ed Patrick Nielsen Hayden), for best novella; the third was for Hell Is the Absence of God (in ...

Dingle, A E

(1879-1947) UK seaman and author, chiefly of sea stories, many published as by Captain Dingle. His pseudonyms include Brian Cotterell and, more prolifically, "Sinbad". It has been suggested that Fletcher's Island (1932; vt Sinister Eden 1934) as by Brian Cotterell is sf or supernatural, but it is in fact a detective novel in an exotic setting. As "Sinbad", he wrote two Lost World tales, Pirates May Fly (1943) and The Age-Old Kingdom (19 August-9 September 1922 Argosy All-Story Weekly; 1947), in ...

Bolton, F H

(?   -?   ) UK author who apparently published only Young Adult books, including three of sf interest: In the Heart of the Silent Sea (1909 Boy's Own Paper; 1910), set in doomed Atlantis; Under the Edge of the Earth: A Story of Three Chums and a Startling Quest (March 29-September 27 1913 Boy's Own Paper; 1913), an Underground tale set in Africa; and Into the Soundless Deeps: A Tale of Wonder and Invention (1917 Boy's Own Paper; 1919), which is set Under the Sea. ...

Cook, Oscar

(1888-1952) UK editor and author, several of his tales of the fantastic being derived from several years in Borneo, "St Urag of the Tail" (July 1926 Weird Tales), an Apes as Human story climaxing in fatal devotions paid to a killer orchid; he is perhaps best known for the nonfiction Borneo: The Stealer of Hearts (1924). Of marginal sf interest is The Seventh Wave (1926), about a Drug-induced cure for a mysterious disease which causes blindness and intense pain; the tale climaxes in scenes of ...

Carr, Charles

Pseudonym of Sydney Charles Mason (1901-1985), a prolific UK author – primarily of Westerns under a variety of names including Colt Henderson and John Langley. His two Bel novels, Colonists of Space (1954) and its sequel Salamander War (1955), routinely deal with colonizing humans and their conflicts with the original salamander inhabitants of the planet Bel (see Colonization of Other Worlds). [JC/SH]

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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