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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 10 January 2022
Sponsor of the day: David Redd

Phillips, Rog

Working name of US author Roger Phillip (not Phillips as often cited) Graham (1909-1966), a prolific contributor to the sf magazines of the late 1940s and 1950s, often writing as by Craig Browning; married to Mari Wolf 1950-1955. His first story was "Let Freedom Ring!" in December 1945 for Amazing Stories, which, along with its companion magazine Fantastic Adventures, remained his most regular market. He wrote a series of comic stories featuring the character Lefty Baker: "Squeeze Play" ...

Wooding, Chris

(1977-    ) UK author, usually for the Young Adult market, and usually fantasy or horror, including his first novel, Catchman (1998). His most successful singleton is probably The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray (2001), whose Amnesia-ridden protagonist possesses unknowingly the key to understanding a post-Pandemic crime-ridden London threatened by magically infected "wych-kin" and by the invocation of cosmic unpleasantness reminiscent of the Cthulhu Mythos. Wooding's first three ...

Sutherland, James

(1900-1996) Scottish academic and author whose Parody of the Fantastic Voyage genre, The Narrative of Jasper Weeple: Being an Account of his Strange Journey to the Land of Midanglia, and of all that Happened to him in that Country (1930), describes the discovery of a medieval Utopian Lost Race in the heart of contemporary England. Midanglia, a benevolent monarchy, lives according to egalitarian principles: equal pay for all; no marriage, no Religion, no high Technology. Tragically, however, an ...

Open Universe

In cosmology an open universe is a model of the Universe which implies that it will continue to expand forever; in this general sense, the term is found incidentally in many sf novels. However, sf readers also use it in a quite different meaning: to designate a work or series whose characters and venues may be made use of by fans and others in Fanzines without copyright restrictions (although the original authors do sometimes impose constraints). The best known open universes of science fiction ...

Ogden, Aimee

(?   -    ) US author who began to publish work of genre interest with "The Light of the Moon, the Strength of the Storm, the Warmth of the Sun" in Frozen Fairy Tales (anth 2015) edited by Kate Wolford. Her first-written novel, Local Star (2021), combines Space Opera action, partly set in a Space Habitat under threat from something like a Galactic Empire, and a complicated unpacking of a polyamorous compact of characters. Sun-Daughters, Sea-Daughters (2021), ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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