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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Morris, Jan

(1926-2020) UK travel writer and historian, from just after World War Two until the mid-1970s as James Morris; A Venetian Bestiary (1982) is fantasticated within its conventional frame, but she is of genuine sf interest for Last Letters from Hav (1985; exp vt as coll, Hav 2006). In the 1985 iteration, a travel writer named Morris sojourns in the vastly intricate Middle Eastern peninsula and City called Hav, a Zone safely insulated behind a great escarpment or Polder [see The Encyclopedia of ...

Luigi, Belli

An Australian House Name or more likely pseudonym used by Australian author G C Bleeck (1907-1971), author of a large number of Westerns under various names including Brad Cordell, and of thrillers under his own name. As Belli, he is responsible for some short sf in Thrills Incorporated and several novella-length tales of sf interest published in the sister magazine Scientific Thrillers, usually as whole issues. These include Cosmic Calamity (1949 chap), featuring a Mad Scientist, a Ray Gun and ...

Boorman, John

(1933-    ) UK film director, famous for movies like Point Blank (1967) and Deliverance (1972), who novelized his own Zardoz (1974) as Zardoz (1974) with Bill Stair (1939-1991). As a director he has also ventured into fantasy with Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) and the Arthurian Excalibur (1981). The Tailor of Panama (2001), based on John Le Carré's novel The Tailor of Panama (1996), is arguably borderline sf – "political science fiction", as Le Carré ...

Barton, Samuel

(1839-1895) US author who worked as a broker and also published under the pseudonym A B Roker. His sf novel, The Battle of the Swash and the Capture of Canada (1888), thought by Thomas D Clareson to be the first American Future War tale, was written to show the defencelessness of the US coasts (and incidentally the vulnerability of Canada) as the USA and UK come to blows, a conflict eventually won by the US through the invention of self-destructing torpedo boats. This author has been wrongly ...

Bixby, Jerome

(1923-1998) US author and editor; an extremely prolific story-writer; he produced not only a respectable number of sf, fantasy, horror and western stories, but also contributed large quantities of somewhat salacious stories to men's magazines of the 1960s, which have so far escaped bibliographic attention. Pseudonyms used on stories of genre interest include Jay B Drexel, Thornecliffe Herrick, D B Lewis, Harry Neal and Alger Rome, the last in collaboration with Algis Budrys. Bixby also wrote or ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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