Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
Sponsor of the day: John Howard

Salisbury, H B

(?   -?   ) US author of a Utopia, Miss Worden's Hero; Or, the Birth of Freedom (November 1890-April 1891 The Nationalist; 1890; vt The Birth of Freedom: A Socialist Novel 1894), where a great cataclysm makes possible in America the rational establishment of an ideal society on socialist lines. [JC]

Kenyon, Tim

(?   -    ) UK author of an sf novel, Ersatz Nation (2002), set in two Parallel Worlds, one our own, and a second, a Dystopian counterpart to ours run by an entity known as Mother Necessity, who must (rather tamely) be overthrown. [JC]

Spencer, Leonard G

Ziff-Davis House Name used at least twice by Robert Silverberg and Randall Garrett in collaboration, for the stories "The Beast With 7 Tails" (August 1956 Amazing) and "The Girl from Bodies, Inc." (October 1956 Fantastic). A third Spencer story, "The Man with the X-Ray Eyes" (February 1957 Dream World), is identified by the Internet SF Database as being by the same collaborators but unlike the first two is not listed in Silverberg's bibliography at majipoor.com. [DRL/PN]

Blom, Suzanne Allés

(1948-2012) US author who began publishing work of genre interest with "In the Memory of Prince Edward" for Tomorrow: Speculative Fiction in April 1993; her projected Alternate History series – the first volume, Inca: The Scarlet Fringe (2000), hovers between sf and fantasy modalities – posits an Incan resistance to the Spanish Conquistadores in the fifteenth century. The outcome remains for the moment in doubt. [JC]

Bentley, Norman S

(1867-?   ) US lawyer and author whose Future War novel Armada of the Air (1937) counts as an extremely early Hitler Wins tale, though the emphasis here is more on the governmental fanaticism that has disarmed Great Britain by 1946 than on the four dictators (one of them Hitler by clear inference) who wage war by air (the armada boasts thousands of planes) on their hapless foe. [JC]

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies