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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Monkey Punch

(1937-2019) Working name of Kazuhiko Katō, a Japanese Manga artist, largely remembered for a crime caper series (see Crime and Punishment) with frequent crossovers into Equipoise and the Technothriller. His first few strips were published as by Kazuhiko Katō, a pseudonym written with different characters, but pronounced the same as his real name. He reluctantly allowed his editor to call him "Monkey Punch" on what was supposed to be a short-lived, three-month job, the crime series ...

Cameron, Ian

Pseudonym of UK author Donald Gordon Payne (1924-2018), who served in World War Two as a Fleet Air Arm pilot. His sf as Cameron includes two Lost Race novels, The Lost Ones (1961; vt The Island at the Top of the World 1968; rev 1974), set in a warm Viking enclave at the North Pole, and The Mountains at the Bottom of the World (1972; vt Devil Country 1976), set in the southern Andes, where a missing link (see Apes as Human; Evolution) is discovered. The former was filmed by Disney as The Island ...

El-Mohtar, Amal

(1984-    ) Canadian author, poet and editor who first began to publish work of genre interest with "The Crow's Caw" in Shimmer magazine for Summer 2006. She co-edited the online genre Poetry magazine Goblin Fruit (eight issues, 2008-2016), initially with Jessica P Wick and latterly with Caitlin Paxson. The Honey Month (coll 2010 chap) assembles honey-themed tales and verse, including one of her three Rhysling Award-winning poems. / El-Mohtar's short fantasy fiction has ...

Prometheus Award

An Award presented for sf which is at least nominally Libertarian or attempts to "examine the meaning of freedom". It was inaugurated by L Neil Smith in 1979 and relaunched by the newly formed Libertarian Futurist Society in 1982, since when the presentations have been annual. The trophy takes the form of a gold coin "representing free trade and free minds". Prometheus Hall of Fame awards are also given for classic libertarian fiction: the first such presentations were in 1983, to Robert ...

Howard, Hayden

(1925-2014) US author who began publishing sf with "It" for Planet Stories in January 1952, followed by eighteen further magazine stories with the last appearing in 1971. His one sf novel, The Eskimo Invasion (stories April 1965-April 1967 Galaxy; fixup 1967), set rather unusually in Canada, comprises a speculative view of Overpopulation problems conveyed through an episodic tale based on seven stories published in Galaxy, beginning with "Death and Birth of the Angakok" (April 1965 Galaxy) and ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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