Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
Sponsor of the day: John W. Knott Bookseller LLCLogo

Maguire, Don

(1852-1933) US itinerant trader in the Arizona and elsewhere, and author whose reminiscences of his adventurous life, published long after his death as Gila Monsters and Red-Eyed Rattlesnakes: Don Maguire's Arizona Trading Expeditions, 1876-1879 (1997), may be as imaginative as The American Adventurer (coll 1879), a collection of stories, some of them tall tales. One, "The Story of the Second Traveler", is of sf interest: a shipwrecked sailor is rescued, taken to Lima, Peru, where he hears of a ...

VanderMeer, Jeff

(1968-    ) US editor and author, married to Ann VanderMeer, who began to publish work of genre interest, after at least one story published in college, with "So the Dead Walk Slowly" in Fear for November 1989, and who is probably best known for the Ambergris sequence of novels and tales, which begins with two novellas, Dradin, in Love: A Tale of Elsewhen & Otherwhere (1996 chap) and The Hoegbotton Guide to the Early History of Ambergris by Duncan Shriek (1999 chap) ...

Cooper, James Fenimore

(1789-1851) US author, best known for the Leather-Stocking Tales sequence in a gentlemanly frontier-adventure tale style, which includes The Last of the Mohicans (1826) and many other widely read novels featuring the woodsman Natty Bumppo; he also wrote several Gothic tales containing supernatural elements, like the broad hints that the protagonist of The Spy, a Tale of the Neutral Ground (1821 2vols) may be the Wandering Jew. In Cooper's sf novel, The Monikins: A Tale (1835 3vols), an English ...

Buckle, Richard

(1916-2001) UK music critic who specialized in ballet, and author of a fantasticated Utopia, John Innocent at Oxford: A Fantasy (1939), which depicts a late-twentieth-century Oxford (and hence Britain) as though Max Beerbohm or Ronald Firbank had dreamed it – extravagant, witty, class-obsessed, boneless – all hilariously rendered. It may well be the last "irresponsible" pastoral utopia published before World War Two put an end to any such mild-mannered vision of Decadence; it would ...

Severn, David

Pseudonym of UK author David Storr Unwin (1918-2010), a member of the Unwin publishing family; most of his work was for older children, beginning with Rick Afire! (1942), the first of several nonfantastic titles – the rick here in question being in fact a mundane hayrick – in the Crusoe sequence, which was followed by the Warners series, similarly nonfantastic, perhaps so designed to comfort readers living through World War Two and its aftermath. Severn's later fantasy and sf tales, ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies