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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Lindall, Edward

Pseudonym of Australian author Edward Ernest Smith (1915-1978), in whose Near Future sf novel, Roar of the Lion (1969), a 1980s insurrection, modelled on the example of the Viet Cong, ignites an Island in the South Pacific; the major powers soon intervene. [JC]

Cassius Minor

Pseudonym of UK solicitor and author Harold Northway Robbins (1874-1973), who surfaces as the acknowledged author of the introduction (but in fact of the entire text) of The Finding of Mercia (1909), a Utopia run by strict Christians in favour of state ownership but not Money. [JC]

Schwahn, John George

(?   -?   ) US author of The Tableau; Or, Heaven as a Republic (1892), a Utopia governed by a strict adherence to reason. [JC]

Arnett, Jack

House Name, initially a pseudonym of Mike McQuay, used for the Bantam Book of Justice action-adventure series with intermittent sf content, opening with The Book of Justice #1: Genocide Express (1989). Apparently McQuay wrote one volume (not necessarily the first to appear) and farmed out the rest to others; John J Miller has claimed responsibility for The Book of Justice #3: Death Force (1990). [DRL]

Southon, Arthur E

(1887-1964) UK minister and author, much of his fiction being adventure tales set in Africa. They include A Yellow Napoleon: A Romance of West Africa (1923), which describes an attempted insurrection in the immediate Near Future; and Jackson's Ju-Ju (1927; vt The God of Gold: A Tale of the West African Coast 1927), a Lost Race novel. [JC]

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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