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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Gardner, Maurice B

(1905-1977) US machinist for a Maine railroad and author of the Bantan series of novels, set on a South Pacific Island, but directly influenced by Edgar Rice Burroughs, whose Tarzan books he began reading at an early age; the series, whose sf content is borderline, begins with Bantan, God-Like Islander (1936; vt Bantan of the Islands 1957), includes a Lost Race in Bantan Primeval (1961), and ends with The New Adventures of Bantan (coll 1977). [JC]

Fraser, Ronald

(1888-1974) UK soldier, civil servant and author, in active service during World War One until an injury left him permanently disabled. Most of his work, like his first novel, The Flying Draper (1924; rev 1931), utilizes fantasy or sf devices – in this initial case levitation (see Telekinesis) – to create allegorical or philosophical arguments, unmistakably influenced by H G Wells: the draper in this first novel, for instance, finds that the ability to fly enforces almost literally ...

Wilson, Colin

(1931-2013) UK author of speculative works, who remains best known for his first book, The Outsider (1956), in which he gave graphic expression to the brilliant autodidactism, the erratic system-building mentality, the tendency to treat himself (and a previous few others) as a natural elite, and the voracity for new mental sensations that would mark the very numerous titles he would produce over the next several decades, many of them of some indirect interest to sf and fantasy writers and ...

Livoni, Cathy

(1956-    ) US author of the Young Adult sf novel, Element of Time (1983), which is a Space Opera. [JC]

Hadley, Arthur T

(1924-2015) US journalist and author, not to be confused with his grandfather, the nonfiction writer and academic Arthur Twining Hadley (1856-1930); in his sf Satire, The Joy Wagon (1958), a Robot with a Computer brain known as Minivac runs for President in a sharply comic send-up of the US electoral system, and almost wins. [JC] see also: Politics. /

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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