Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
Sponsor of the day: John W. Knott Bookseller LLCLogo

Microsoft Space Simulator

Videogame (1994). Bruce Artwick Organization (BAO). Designed by Charles Guy. Platforms: DOS. / Microsoft Space Simulator is a Toy Game which simulates historical and technologically extrapolated forms of space exploration, much influenced by the developers' line of flight simulators beginning with Flight Simulator (1979 subLOGIC, AppleII; 1980 TRS80) designed by Bruce Artwick and continuing as the Microsoft Flight Simulator series. The majority of players' time is typically spent in the ...

Silicon Dreams

Videogame series (from 1983). Level 9 Computing (L9). / The Silicon Dreams trilogy is a series of text-based science fiction Adventures. The first game, Snowball (1983 L9, Atari8, C64, Spectrum; 1984 Amstrad, MSX) designed by Mike Austin, Nick Austin, Pete Austin, is set aboard a slower than light colony starship (the "Snowball 9") approaching its destination in the solar system of 40 Eridani A. The ship design strongly resembles the "Enzmann Starship" proposed by Dr Robert Enzmann in 1969, ...

Lambourne, John

Working name of UK author John Battersby Crompton Lamburn (1893-1972), brother of the author of the Just William children's books, Richmal Crompton (1890-1969). Lambourne's Professor Ellis Lost Race tales – The Kingdom that Was (1931) and its sequel The Second Leopard (1932) – en passant describe in mildly allegorical, subduedly humorous terms how 50,000 years ago (see Origin of Man) the apathetic rulers of the animal kingdom were led to abdicate in favour of mankind. Lambourne also ...

Giesy, J U

(1877-1947) US physiotherapist, screenwriter and Pulp-magazine writer, author of many stories, most not sf, in Argosy and All-Story Weekly 1914-1934. All for His Country (21 February-14 March 1914 Cavalier; 1915), which combines Future War and Edisonade elements, pits a young inventor's radium-powered plane (see Elements), complete with Antigravity, against the treacherous Japanese, who burn Los Angeles (see California) to the ground, and who boast their own Weapon, an advanced aerial torpedo; ...

Technothriller

A common term, used in this encyclopedia to designate a tale which, though it often makes use of sf devices, in fact occupies an undisplaced, essentially mundane narrative world, one that – during the years when technothrillers were most popular, from the 1950s to the 1970s – was commonly seen through a Cold War lens. Though usually taking place in the present day, technothrillers may be set in the Near Future and invoke Technologies beyond the capacities of the present moment, but ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies