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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Abbott, Edwin A

(1838-1926) UK clergyman, academic and author whose most noted work, published originally as by A Square, is Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (1884; rev 1884) (see Dimensions). Narrated and illustrated by Mr Square, the novel falls into two parts. The first is a highly entertaining description of the two-dimensional world of Flatland, in which inhabitants' shapes establish their (planar) hierarchical status. In the second part, Mr Square travels in a dream to the one-dimensional universe ...

MacPherson, John F

(1873-1939) Australian-born author, in UK by 1891; in his complex Future War novel, A Yankee Napoleon (1907), two Scientists – one a Mad Scientist who uses his Inventions for evil, the other an ethical Superman figure – oppose one another, as the mad one devises a brain serum that supplies him, vampirically, with mental energy sufficient for him to become the Emperor of America. In the end, after Britain's initial defeat in her attempted Invasion of America, and much warfare Under ...

Stockton, Frank R

(1834-1902) US editor and author, whose known pseudonyms for early work included Paul Fort and John Lewees. He worked on Scribner's Magazine before becoming assistant editor of St Nicholas Magazine 1873-1881, and began to publish stories for children with "The Slight Mistake" for the American Courier in 1855, though his first tale to gain much attention was "Ting-a-ling" (1867 Riverside Magazine for Young People); it was assembled, along with other stories about the eponymous elf, as his first ...

Morgan, Dan

(1925-2011) UK poet, author and professional guitarist, about which instrument he wrote two successful manuals, Guitar (1965) and Spanish Guitar (1982). He began publishing sf with "Alien Analysis" for New Worlds in January 1952. His first sf novels, Cee-Tee Man (1955) and The Uninhibited (August-October 1957 New Worlds as "Uninhibited"; 1961), were routine adventures, but The Richest Corpse in Show Business (1966) stood out for its slapstick guying of sf conventions. He published the Venturer ...

Wright, Allen Kendrick

(1861-1948) US minister and author whose To the Poles by Airship; Or, Around the World Endways (1909) confusedly but intriguingly surrounds the narrative of a round-the-world trip, in an Airship powered by liquid air (see Power Sources), with a series of speculations and visions: a Lost Race inhabiting Atlantis is glimpsed; a Future War is described, along with a Utopia complete with advanced Technology. Dalleszona and the Seventh Treasure (1922) is a Lost Race tale, featuring descendants of ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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