Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 23 May 2022
Sponsor of the day: Anonymous ($700)

Nobel Prize

The Nobel Prize for Literature, chosen annually by the Swedish Academy – with occasional no-award years during World War One and World War Two – is not of course a genre Award. Below are listed the Nobel laureates in this category who have written sf or near-sf to the extent that they receive entries in the present encyclopedia. In addition to the honour, laureates receive a cash prize currently set at eight million Swedish kronor, roughly £730,000 or $900,000 in 2017. The ...

Dent, Lester

(1904-1959) US author who began publishing work of genre interest with "Pirate Cay" for Top Notch Magazine in 1929; best known for his Doc Savage novels, which he created in 1933 and wrote for Doc Savage magazine under the House Name Kenneth Robeson (which see for full description); Dent wrote solo all but 43 of the 181 issues. He also wrote stories under his own name and other crime stories under the pseudonym Tim Ryan. Throughout his career, though pre-eminently before World War Two, Dent was ...

Punch

UK letter-size magazine of Humour and Satire, founded 1841 and first edited by Henry Mayhew (1812-1887) and Mark Lemon (1809-1870). Published weekly 1841-1992, with an unsuccessful revival 1996-2002. / For a century and a half, Punch (initially subtitled The London Charivari) was a British institution which through several of its early decades had considerable influence on UK Politics. The content – mainly humorous and/or satirical nonfiction and copious cartoon Illustration – ...

Psionics

A common item of sf Terminology, usually referring to the study and use of Psi Powers, under which head this meaning is discussed. Never part of the vocabulary of J B Rhine, whose speculations fell on fertile ground in the early-middle days of Genre SF (see Golden Age of SF), the term seems to have first appeared in print in Jack Williamson's story "The Greatest Invention" (July 1951 Astounding). John W Campbell Jr became an eager advocate of psionics, not only in fiction but as a real-world ...

Haseley, Dennis

(1950-    ) US psychotherapist and author who specialized for many years in picture books, the most ambitious of which – like Ghost Catcher (graph 1989), about a man without a shadow who retrieves people from the brink of death – are of general interest. Typically of this author, Dr Gravity (1992), a Young Adult novel, describes the consequences on others of exceptional individuals, in this case a man with power over Gravity who by "freeing" his fellows of its ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies