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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 21 January 2022
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Kepler, Johannes

(1571-1630) German astronomer, one-time assistant to Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) and later imperial mathematician and astrologer to the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II. Kepler's contribution to Astronomy – most notably his three laws of planetary motion – provided vital groundwork for Newton's cosmological synthesis. In 1593 he prepared a dissertation on the heliocentric theory, which explained how events in the heavens would be seen by an observer stationed on the Moon; a new draft, in ...

Dillard, J M

Pseudonym of US author Jeanne M Kalogridis (1954-    ) who, under her own name, is the author of the Chronicles of Family Dracul series of horror novels [see Checklist], as well as at least three historical novels. As Dillard, she is most identified with the Star Trek domain, for which she has written about 15 Ties, beginning with Star Trek: Mindshadow (1986). It is a clear sign of her competence in this field of endeavour that several of these Ties novelize Star Trek ...

Hallen, A L

(?   -?   ) UK author whose Angilin: A Venite King (1907) is among several novels by early writers that prefigure the Planetary Romances of Edgar Rice Burroughs, though without the flair. The planet in question is Venus; the protagonist is an Earthman who transports his psyche there in an attempt to find his dead love, and finds himself inhabiting the soul of the eponymous king of Venus (see Identity Transfer). The plot is ornate and dynastic, and Airships are used ...

Xenoforming

A term logically based on the more familiar Terraforming, to denote the (usually gradual) transformation of a world to suit Alien rather than Earth-human Biology and Ecology. / The highest sf drama arises when xenoforming attempts are initiated by Extraterrestrials wishing to transform Earth for their own purposes. The Red Weed introduced by invading Martians in H G Wells's The War of the Worlds (1898) may be intended as part of such a process. Xenoforming of Earth takes place successfully ...

Morgan, Edwin

(1920-2010) Scottish poet, active from the mid 1930s; ranked somewhere above George Mackay Brown or Edwin Muir (1887-1959), and just below the pre-eminent Hugh MacDiarmid (1892-1976), in the pantheon of twentieth century poets in Scotland. Though much of the work of many contemporary poets can be understood as cognate or intimate with Fantastika as a whole, Morgan is unusual among writers of the first rank to have written more than a few poems of direct sf interest, some – like "In ...

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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