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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 27 June 2022
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Once Upon a Time

Russian animated film (1990; original title Kogda-to davno ...; vt A Long Time Ago). Soyuzmultfilm. Directed by Galina Barinova. Written by Ante Zaninovic. Narration by Alina Pokrovskaya. 17 minutes. Colour. / In a time, we are told, so distant that it might be the deep past or Far Future, we see a City. Externally its outlines resemble a many-turreted castle; internally it is futuristic, inspired by M C Escher – the industrial area resembles his Cubic Space Division (1953) – ...

Time Machine, The

1. Film (1960). Galaxy Films/MGM. Produced and directed by George Pal. Written by David Duncan, based on The Time Machine (1895) by H G Wells. Cast includes Sebastian Cabot, Yvette Mimieux, Rod Taylor and Alan Young. Morlock designs by Pal (uncredited). 103 minutes. Colour. / Unlike Pal's earlier Wells adaptation, War of the Worlds (1953), The Time Machine is set in the Victorian era – at least at the beginning of the film – and it is these sequences, with the inventor ...

Small Wonder

US tv series (1985-1989). Metromedia Productions, 20th Century Fox Television. Syndicated. Produced by Howard Leeds, Budd Grossman, Jean Hester, Bruce Taylor. Directors included Peter Baldwin, Linda Day, Leslie H Martinson. Writers included Dick Christie, Donald Ross, David Silverman. Cast includes William Bogart, Tiffany Brissette, Dick Christie, Alice Ghostley, Edie McClurg (first season only), Marla Pennington, Emily Schulman and Jerry Suprian. 96 30-minute episodes. Colour. / Howard ...

Wild Talents

This is Charles Fort's term – made famous by his book Wild Talents (1932) – for the complex of supposed paranormal abilities which are discussed in this encyclopedia's entries for ESP and Psi Powers. Wilson Tucker borrowed the phrase for the title of his relevant novel Wild Talent (1954; exp 1955; vt The Man from Tomorrow 1955); Ron Goulart also adopted it for his Wild Talents sequence, beginning with A Talent for the Invisible (1973). Many other authors have made use of the phrase. ...

Robertson, Al

(?   -    ) UK musician and author who began to publish work of genre interest with "Golden" in The Third Alternative for Spring 2004; his first novel Crashing Heaven (2015), which begins the Station series, is a Space Opera with Cyberpunk intonations, set in a period after Earth has been abandoned due to the behaviour of Homo sapiens, and while the human survivors remain constrained to the Solar System, where they mostly occupy a vast Space Habitat. The ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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