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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Steelbaugh, Larry

(?   -    ) US author of the Tankwar sequence beginning with Tankwar (1990) and ending with Tankwar: Desert Prey (1993), a series of Military SF tales set during World War Three, with a Technothriller focus on tank Technology. Nothing is known of Steelbaugh; the name may be a pseudonym. [JC]

Hughes, Ted

(1930-1998) Working name of UK poet Edward James Hughes for all his writing. He is best known for volumes of dark, violent verse such as Crow (coll 1970; rev 1971), which like much of his work features representations of other species in terms hinting at internally generated but mythically resonant metamorphoses; also of interest as an unfettered contribution to the fantastic is Gaudete (1977), a book-length narrative poem whose protagonist, after his abduction into Hell, is replaced by a ...

Hoornaert, Edward

(1981-    ) Belgian author, now in the USA, who began publishing work of genre interest with "Devil, Devil" for On Spec in 2000; and whose sf novel, The Trial of Tompa Lee (2005), is, unusually for Military SF, a courtroom drama, set on an Alien planet. The spunky young protagonist manages to defend herself in the end against unjust charges. [JC]

Millet, Lydia

(1968-    ) US author whose second novel, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love: A Presidential Romance (2000), is political Satire, climaxing in a slightly fantasticated scene at the White House; its modestly raunchy exuberance marks it in retrospect as reflecting a more "innocent" world than that initiated by the Fall of the Towers slightly later in Bush's presidency. Some other early novels lay heavy stress on mimetic conventions, without breaking them; but Millet's fifth ...

Raphael, Rick

(1919-1994) US author and journalist who began publishing sf with "A Filbert is a Nut" for Astounding in November 1959 and established a considerable reputation in the field with a comparatively small output of about ten stories, most of them assembled in The Thirst Quenchers (coll 1965) and Code Three (fixup 1966). The first contains four good stories, the best of which is the title story about professionals in a future where Earth's water is carefully rationed, their job being its proper ...

Robinson, Roger

(1943-    ) UK computer programmer, bibliographer and publisher, active in UK Fandom for many years. The Writings of Henry Kenneth Bulmer (1983 chap; rev 1984 chap) is an exhaustive Bibliography of one of the most prolific sf writers, and Who's Hugh?: An SF Reader's Guide to Pseudonyms (1987) is similarly exhaustive in its listing of Pseudonyms. Criticized at first for its failure to annotate its findings – so that, for instance, pseudonyms used for sf could not be ...



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