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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 21 January 2022
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Funaro, Sergio

(1922-1986) San Marino-born physician and author, in US from before World War Two; the overall remit of his Future History, How It All Ended: The Decline and Demise of the West as Reconstructed by Johann Sebastian Barberini in the Year of our Lord 4776 (1973), is indicated by its subtitle. [JC]

Womack, Jack

(1956-    ) US author whose first five novels are stylish and potent exercises in a post-Cyberpunk urban idiom, and comprise the first instalments in the loose ongoing Terraplane series about the state of America; the sixth volume followed later. The sequence, reminiscent at points of the baroque New York detective fictions of Jerry Oster (1943-    ), begins with Ambient (1987), set in the complexly desolated warzone which New York has become in the early ...

Fearing, Kenneth

(1902-1961) US poet and author, who supported himself in early years in part by writing softcore pornography as by Kirk Wolff, and whose early renown as a poet faded perceptibly even before his death; he is now known mainly for mysteries like The Big Clock (1946), a tale whose atmosphere adumbrates the film-noir tonality of later US fantasy. Fearing's only sf novel proper is Clark Gifford's Body (1942), which gravely and literately portrays a Near-Future US civil war, its thirty point-of-view ...

Shibano Takumi

(1926-2010) Japanese author, translator and critic. Shibano began writing sf as Rei Kozumi (a play on the Japanese version of "Cosmic Ray") while a high-school mathematics teacher, a job he quit in 1977 to become a full-time translator. He published his first short story in 1951. Later, 1969-1975, he published three sf juveniles, including Hokkyoku City no Hanran ["Revolt in North Pole City"] (1977). But his influence on Japanese sf lay more in his work as editor and publisher of the widely ...

Besher, Alexander

(1951-2020) China-born, Japanese-raised US author, editor and journalist who published a posthumous edition of David Lindsay's tales as The Violet Apple & The Witch (1976) in his Chicago Review Press, and who began to publish sf in English (some stories had appeared in Japanese) with his Rim cycle, comprising Rim: A Novel of Virtual Reality (1994), Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality (1998) and Chi (1999). The first of these is perhaps the most innovative – Brian Stableford used a term of ...

Nicholls, Peter

(1939-2018) Australian editor and author, primarily a critic and historian of sf through his creation and editing of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction [see below]; resident in the UK 1970-1988, in Australia from 1988; worked as an academic in English literature (1962-1968, 1971-1977), scripted television documentaries, was a Harkness Fellow in Film-making (1968-1970) in the USA, worked as a publisher's editor (1982-1983), often broadcast film and book reviews on BBC Radio from 1974 and ...



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