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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Planetary Romance

Any sf tale whose primary venue (excluding contemporary or Near-Future versions of Earth) is a planet, and whose plot turns to a significant degree upon the nature of that venue, can be described as a planetary romance. For the term to apply properly, however, it is not enough that a tale simply be set on a world: James Blish's A Case of Conscience (September 1953 If; exp 1958), for instance, has a planet as a primary venue yet cannot be called a planetary romance because the nature or ...

Pearson's Weekly

UK 16pp tabloid magazine published by C A Pearson Ltd, edited by Peter Keary and others. Weekly, 26 July 1890 to 1 April 1939. Retitled The New Pearson and Today from 17 September 1938, and The New Pearson's Weekly from 26 November 1938. Incorporated into Tit-Bits from 8 April 1939. / Pearson's Weekly was the first magazine C Arthur Pearson set up when he left the employ of George Newnes in 1890 and it was notable for its publicity stunts. Right from the first issue, Pearson reprinted ...

Aiken, Joan

(1924-2004) UK author, daughter of Conrad Aiken, stepdaughter of Martin Armstrong [for both men see The Encyclopedia of Fantasy under links below], and sister of John Aiken; best known as a highly prolific author of fantasy for children and Young Adult readers. Almost none of her many adult novels contain explicit fantasy content, though some have supernatural implications; of these titles, Castle Barebane (1976) is a streamlined Gothic and The Haunting of Lamb House (coll of linked stories ...

Sayles, John

(1950-    ) US author and film-maker who made his reputation as a writer with the novels Pride of the Bimbos (1975) and Union Dues (1977) and his collection The Anarchist's Convention (coll 1979). He began writing scripts for exploitation movies in the late 1970s, and enjoyed a burst of creativity in association with Roger Corman, Joe Dante, Lewis Teague and Steven Spielberg. His sf and fantasy screenplays, always lively and self-aware, are Piranha (1978), Battle beyond the ...

Takemiya Keiko

(1950-    ) Japanese Comics artist, sharing with Moto Hagio a central position within the Year 24 Group and the winner of the first Seiun Award for Best Comic of the Year, in 1978. A precocious talent, Takemiya famously proclaimed herself to be Shōtarō Ishinomori's "first female disciple", after learning much of her craft from his book Mangaka Nyūmon ["Introduction for Manga Creators"] (graph 1965). After earlier competition wins, her first published work, ...

Clute, John

(1940-    ) Canadian critic, editor and author, in the UK from 1969; married to Judith Clute from 1964, partner of Elizabeth Hand since 1996. His first professional publication was the long sf-tinged poem "Carcajou Lament" (Winter 1960 [ie Autumn 1959] Triquarterly), though he only began publishing sf reviews in 1964 and sf proper with "A Man Must Die" in New Worlds for November 1966, where much of his earlier criticism also appeared. This criticism, despite some studiously ...



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