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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 23 May 2022
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Ames, Joseph Bushnell

(1878-1928) US author, mostly of Westerns, of sf interest for his last novel, The Bladed Barrier (1929), a Lost Race/Lost World tale set behind the eponymous barrier in a hidden valley in Baja California (see California), where two young prospectors come across an ancient Chinese civilization, its evil ruler (see Yellow Peril), and an unwilling priestess who turns out to be a white girl willing to be rescued. Other Westerns with lost race elements, sometimes minor, are listed below. [JC]

Technology

Although various literary traditions supplied inspiration and continued support to Proto SF, it was the perception of the power which the new Machines of the Industrial Revolution had to transform the world which gave birth to sf itself, inspiring Jules Verne's imaginary voyages, George Griffith's Future-War stories, H G Wells's Scientific Romances, the hi-tech Utopian fantasies of Edward Bellamy and others, and the mechanized Dystopian nightmares which dissented from them. The demands of ...

Borderlands

Australian Small Press magazine of Speculative Fiction, which included not only fantasy and horror but also Slipstream SF, published and edited in Perth, Western Australia, by a consortium that included Stephen Dedman, Simon Oxwell and Anna Hepworth. It made small token payments for fiction. Its name was derived from a small Convention held in Perth in 2001 which had seen the release of an anthology Borderlands: The World Within (anth 2001 chap) edited by Anna Hepworth, Simon Oxwell and Grant ...

Laika

UK indie-rock band founded in 1993 by US-born musician and singer Margaret Fiedler McGinnis (1967-    ) and UK bass-guitarist John Frenett (1970-    ) and named (of course) for the first mammal to orbit the earth. The group's complexly rhythmic, slippery, hypnotic music manifests a persistent fascination with outer space. The band's first release, Silver Apples of the Moon (1995) – this album has no relation to Morton Subotnick's 1967 release ...

Kirk, Hyland C

(1846-1917) US author of speculative nonfiction, including the nonfiction The Possibility of Not Dying (1883); his two books of sf interest are When Age Grows Young (1888), a Utopia set in the Near Future where technological progress has brought felicity and a chance of Immortality; and The Revolt of the Brutes: A Fantasy of the Chicago Fair (1893), a tale of fantasticated Devolution. [JC]

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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