Search SFE    Search EoF

  Omit cross-reference entries  

Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 20 June 2022
Sponsor of the day: John W. Knott Bookseller LLCLogo

von Trojan, Kurt

(1937-2006) Austrian-born journalist and author, in Australia from the 1940s. His first novel, The Transing Syndrome (1985), uses "transing" (Matter Transmission) to move the plot along in an Alternate-World Dystopia; the protagonist worries that his Identity may be fading with each transmission, like increasingly obscure photocopies of a photocopy. Bedmates (1987) is Satire set in a future Australia dominated by AIDS and sexual fear (see Sex): "bedmates" are mindless artefacts always ready for ...

Kneale, Nigel

(1922-2006) UK author and screenwriter, married to the well-known children's author Judith Kerr (1923-2019) from 1954 until his death; active from around 1944, very occasionally as by Nigel Neale. After attending the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and working as an actor, Kneale began writing short stories, twenty-six of which – some horror or fantasy – appear in Tomato Cain and Other Stories (coll 1949; rev 1950). Since then most of his writing work was for Television and film, ...

De Mendelssohn, Peter

(1908-1982) German author of Jewish birth, born Peter von Mendelssohn, whose publishing career, which began in 1930, was interrupted by exile after 1933; by World War Two he was a UK citizen, though he returned to Munich in 1970. His sf novel, Fortress in the Skies: A Tale (1943; vt The Hours and the Centuries: A Tale 1944) as by Peter Mendelssohn, which was written in English, sets a Utopia in a deserted mountain village, a redoubt-like Zone seemingly detached from historical time, though by ...

Maison d'Ailleurs, La

"The house of elsewhere", subtitled (in French) "The museum of Utopia, of extraordinary voyages and of science fiction". This establishment in Yverdon, Switzerland, contains about 50,000 items relating to sf, maybe half of them books and magazines, the remainder all sorts of ephemera: Toys, Games, stamps, posters, calendars, etc. Founded in 1975 by Pierre Versins, who donated his celebrated private Collection to it, it was given much-needed financial assistance by the town of Yverdon in 1989, ...

Oldrey, John

(?   -?   ) Pseudonym of an unidentified UK author based in the Pancras area of London, whose sf novel is The Devil's Henchmen (1926). Unusually for a Lost Race tale, this is set in the future; it locates the lost realm north of India, where advanced Technology allows its inhabitants to maintain a secret Utopia. [JC]

Robinson, Roger

(1943-    ) UK computer programmer, bibliographer and publisher, active in UK Fandom for many years. The Writings of Henry Kenneth Bulmer (1983 chap; rev 1984 chap) is an exhaustive Bibliography of one of the most prolific sf writers, and Who's Hugh?: An SF Reader's Guide to Pseudonyms (1987) is similarly exhaustive in its listing of Pseudonyms. Criticized at first for its failure to annotate its findings – so that, for instance, pseudonyms used for sf could not be ...



x
This website uses cookies.  More information here. Accept Cookies