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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

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Gerard, Morice

Pseudonym of UK clergyman and author John Jessop Teague (1856-1929), author of many historical novels, and of The New Order (1917), a vision of the Near Future from a staunchly rightwing perspective. [JC]

Curry, E S

(1837-1906) Canadian-born minister and author, who became a US citizen in 1901; his The No-Din: Romance, History and Science of Pre-Historic Races of America and Other Lands (1899) is Prehistoric SF. Somewhat confusedly, 8000 years after the birth of Adam, an Edenic continent in the South Pacific is destroyed by a Comet; the survivors of this Disaster flee far and wide in Airships – including the No-Din itself and eventually colonize "Amurica", "Atlantuz", "Ophur" and other territories. ...

Rowcroft, Charles

(1798-1856) UK author, in Australia between 1821 and 1825, perhaps best known for his Australian adventure fiction assembled in Tales of the Colonies (coll 1843) and its successors. In his sf novel, The Triumph of Woman: A Christmas Story (1848), an inhabitant of sexless Neptune (see Outer Planets) visits a German, with whose daughter he falls in love amid erudite discussions of Neptunian science. The plot then devolves into a Satirical travelogue, mainly targeted at women (see Feminism; Women ...

McGuire, Richard

(1957-    ) US comics artist and author whose Graphic Novel Here (graph 2014), which began as a short story in graphic form, "Here" (January 1989 RAW), is of considerable sf interest. The basic structure of the enterprise is non-chronological. Each double-page panel gives a perspectivally invariant view of a single location in north-eastern America, probably semi-rural New Jersey, so that the "tale" is locked in space. Time, however, is fluid: each panel is precisely dated, ...

Watkins, William John

(1942-    ) US poet, author and academic, associate professor then full professor of English at Brookdale Community College, New Jersey (now retired). For early work up to 1980 his working name was William Jon Watkins [see Checklist below for byline distinctions]. He was initially active as a poet, his first book being Five Poems (coll 1968 chap). His first sf novel, with Gene Snyder, was Ecodeath (1972), a Pollution story in which the leading characters are called Snyder ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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