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Welcome to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Fourth Edition. Some sample entries appear below. Click here for the Introduction; here for the masthead; here for Acknowledgments; here for the FAQ; here for advice on citations. Find entries via the search box above (more details here) or browse the menu categories in the grey bar at the top of this page.

Site updated on 24 January 2022
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Bird, William Henry Fleming

(1896-1971) UK art lecturer and author who published some magazine sf in the 1950s under his own name, and also as John Toucan and John Eagle. His debut story was "War Potential" (October 1952 Tales of Tomorrow) as by John Toucan, and the first under his own name was "Critical Age" (1953 Futuristic Science Stories #12). Later work was almost exclusively written for the firm of Curtis Warren and was also released under House Names: War of Argos (1952) as by Rand Le Page; Two Worlds (1952) as by ...

Sabin, Edwin L

(1870-1952) US author and historian best known for his heavily researched boys' adventure novels. He began as a journalist with a penchant for poetry and his early fiction is light-hearted, almost presaging P G Wodehouse in its eccentricity. The Magic Mashie and Other Golfish Stories (coll 1902) is a volume of humorous golfing stories a few of which verge on the fantastic, such as "The Supersensitive Golf-Ball" about a golf-ball that reacts to the player's emotions (see Games and Sports). A ...

Lunar Lander

Videogame (1969). Designed by Jim Storer. Platforms: Mainframe, Arcade, Others. / The first version of Lunar Lander, known as the Lunar Landing Game (1969 Mainframe) and designed by Jim Storer, was turn-based, using a keyboard to accept commands and a teletype printer to display the results. In a homage to the Apollo missions, players had to land a lunar module on the surface of the Moon, while conserving their limited supply of fuel. Storer was a student at a US high school when he wrote ...

Cendrars, Blaise

Pseudonym of Swiss-born editor, controversialist, adventurer (though his memoirs contain a great deal of fiction), poet, film maker and author Frédéric-Louis Sauser (1887-1961), in France from around 1910, signing as Blaise Cendrars from 1912; he was in active service during World War One, losing an arm in combat. His career as experimenter, agitator, constantly restless plunger into numerous genres (which he mixed), began before the War, most of this work being poetry, his first ...

Burke, Jonathan

Working name for most of his sf of UK author John Burke (1922-2011), who wrote sf and fantasy under his own name (much of his short sf is so signed) as well as J F Burke and Robert Miall, and who used various other pseudonyms for non-fantastic work. He was active in Fandom in the 1930s (see The Fantast; The Futurian; The Satellite), only beginning to publish sf proper with "Chessboard" for New Worlds in January 1953. Prior to this he had made an early sale to Tales of Wonder with "Before the ...

Langford, David

(1953-    ) UK author, critic, editor, publisher and sf fan, in the latter capacity recipient of 21 Hugo awards for fan writing – some of the best of his several hundred pieces are assembled as Let's Hear It for the Deaf Man (coll 1992 chap US; much exp vt The Silence of the Langford 1996; exp 2015 ebook) as Dave Langford, edited by Ben Yalow – plus five Best Fanzine Hugos and one Semiprozine Hugo for his self-produced news magazine, Ansible (which see). His one ...



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